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Lord of the Rings Vol. I (lord_of_the_ring_1_manual.txt)

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PARAGRAPH TEXT

1."A palantir!" you exclaim. You laugh to think that one of these
legendary seeing stones has lain
here in The Shire all these ages. With awe, you carefully wipe the dust from its
crystalline surface. As you do, a faint rosy glow takes hold within the
palantir. The glow gives way to a misty red-tinged vision of a dark figure
sitting upon a ceramic stool, reading a scroll.  Suddenly the Dark One looks up,
his single flaming red eye glaring with malice. "Sssssss," he hisses.
"Read  NOT those paragraphs for which you have been given no instructions.
There is a special place in Mordor for the likes of you!"  And with that,
the vision disappears. Yet even as it fades, you hear a muttered,
"You'd think being a Dark Lord would grant you some privacy, but
NOOOO!"

2. Apparently, some kind of answer is needed to pass through here.

3. Again, Elrond's voice rings clear and commanding throughout the council
hall. "There can 
only be one conclusion drawn from these tales -- that the Enemy is moving again
in Middle-earth. He seeks for the One Ring, and though the power of the three
Elven Rings is strong, they alone cannot long resist the spreading shadow of his
evil. We cannot keep the Ring here, nor would it be long safe in Lothlorien or
any dwarven citadel. Neither can we trust it to be cast into the sea. Therefore
the Ring must be destroyed."
Elrond's gaze pierces the Ringbearer. "I cannot ask you to undertake
such a task, yet I know of none 
other who is more able. Will you take the Ring south to Mount Doom to cast it in
the fire?"

4. Freddi is free from the spider, but badly wounded. He's doing his best
not to sob, and is 
overjoyed to be with people who will help him get home. He joins your party.
Several items are 
scattered nearby, including the bones of a dwarf that died trussed up like a
roasting pig, an old axe, 
a star-shaped key, and a weather-worn scroll with legible dwarf-runes in his
hand. The scroll is 
readable.

5. The passageway widens into a dark chamber. At its center lies a great
circular hole with rusty 
chains dangling down into the darkness.  Possibly this was used as some great
well of old. Three 
arched passageways lead to the east. The leftmost arch descends deeper. The
central arch leads on a 
level course, and the rightmost ascends to some higher place.

6. Erestor pauses, considers his words, then continues. When first the folk of
Durin came to dwell 
beneath the Misty Mountains, the mightiest of their craftsmen created a weapon
of surpassing 
power. Naming it Durin's Axe after the First Father, the dwarves cleansed
the depths of Khazad-
dum, that is Moria, of creatures dark and dangerous. With the fall of Moria,
this weapon passed 
from the tales of Durin's folk. Some say that it was found and now rests in
an Orcish treasure hoard 
somewhere deep within the mines of Moria.

7. The spirit spoke truthfully. There is indeed a secret cabinet above the
fireplace!

8. From a carefully scripted scroll, you read "Moria, the Black Chasm,
Khazad-dum in the tongue 
of Dwarves, was a great dwarven city deep beneath the Misty Mountains. Itís
western gate faces 
onto the lost land of Eregion, also called Hollin. Its eastern entrance opens
onto the Dimrill Dale, 
and the Golden Woods of Lothlorien. Great stairs reached high into the mountain
peaks and delved 
deep into terrible underground secrets. It is indeed one of the unequalled
wonders of Middle-earth. 
It is also a place of horror and doom. For now, no dwarves live there -- only
foul, darkness-loving, 
creatures."

9. A representative of the dwarves of the Lonely Mountain speaks. "Know
that an emissary of the 
Dark One approached our home in the Lonely Mountain and asked us to tell him
where to find the 
least of rings, a mere trinket that Sauron fancied. We have defied him for many
months. But we 
must know more of this ring and why the Evil One seeks it so urgently. I was
sent here for your 
wise council, while another party, including some of the men of Dale, went as
emissaries to the 
Lady of Lothlorien."

10. A voice whispers. "From Nain's cairn. EAST. NORTH. EAST. EAST.
NORTH. EAST." 

11. The parchment reads, "As the approach of the forces of the Witch-king
became certain, Arveleg 
I, King of Arthedain gave two pieces of the Sword that was Broken to his
youngest son, Amonar, to 
hide within the barrows of the Kings of Cardolan east of the Dark Forest. The
third he hid deep 
within the fortress of Amon Sul."

12. Your torchlight gleams dully off a ring of rusty keys hanging on the
red-brown rock wall near 
the sleeping figure. Without sharp eyes you might have missed them hanging here.

13. "When I was but a foolish lad, I found this rusty sword in the barrows
south o' here. Old Healer 
Rushdock told me it were a bit o' old magic from the ancient time of the
Kings. Mayhap you folk 
can use it in your travels?"

14. "Enjoy your stay with us good folk! Nob will make up your rooms.
There's a blaze in the 
parlour and food will be along soon." "Hi! Nob!" He shouts,
"Nob! Where are you, you woolly-
footed slowcoach." Turning back to you, he says, "If you've any
ponies, I'll have Bob see to it that 
they are taken care of."

15. An aging, but still burly man with a ruddy nose to match his name is lifting
large stone weights 
behind the counter. Odd pictures on the wall show men and hobbits going through
the stages of 
several vigorous physical activities.

16. No hobbit would leave his hole in such a state. Smashed furniture, broken
crockery, torn books 
and crumpled clothing lie strewn about the room. From here, there is no sign of
the hobbit who 
lived here.

17. The parchment reads, "As the approach of the forces of the Witch King
became certain, Arveleg 
I, King of Arthedain gave two pieces of the Sword that was Broken to his
youngest son, Amonar, to 
hide beyond the Western Bridge near the protection of the elves of the Grey
Havens. The third he 
hid deep within the fortress of Amon Sul.

18. The mournful ruins stand alone. The dwarves built them long ago, and like
most things of 
dwarven manufacture, endure, even when the dwarves themselves were slaughtered
long ago.

19. Above the wide arch, a wide flat signboard swings in the breeze showing a
fat white pony 
reared up on its hind legs. Over the door was painted in white letters: THE
PRANCING PONY by 
BARLIMAN BUTTERBUR. From somewhere inside, a merry song begins and many cheerful

voices loudly join in the chorus.

20. Grotesque carvings encircle the door, frightening enough in what they depict
to chill those who 
gaze up on it. Yet no orc carved these worn stones. Something darker, more evil,
made these 
decorations.

21. "Look for the one you seek at the Forsaken Inn."

22. The parchment reads, "As the approach of the forces of the Witch King
became certain, Arveleg 
I, King of Arthedain gave two pieces of the Sword that was Broken to his
youngest son, Amonar, to 
hide within a cavern of the Misty Mountains near the protection of the elves of
Imladris. The third 
he hid deep within the fortress of Amon Sul.

23. As you approach the cell, a wiry little man with glazed eyes and matted
brown hair and beard 
dances up to the bars. "You're not with them," he cackles.
"I can tell that, I can. Name's Appledore. 
I used to sell curios up in Combe. Ferny said to bring my best goods down here.
Said they were 
paying top coin. You come for the secret? Them Orcs are digging at a secret in
the cave. There's 
something powerful valuable down there. Them Orcs can sense it."  
"Grimbosh's Black Book tells 
them all about it. It has secrets in it, it does," he cackles.   Back at
the bars, he presses his face up 
close, rolls his eyes about and whispers, "Course if you was to set me
free, I could show you them 
secrets."

24. "There was a big man from foreign parts asking for Mr. Baggins. I told
him to go back where he 
came from double quick or I'd set the dogs on him, then he gave a sort of
hiss that might have been 
a laugh and spurred his great horse at me, and I jumped away only in the nick of
time. After that, I 
found my boy in the lane, and I don't know what happened to him. I was
going off to get the healer, 
but I don't want to leave him; will you go to the village and bring him
back? It's not far and I'm very 
worried. He isn't waking up."

25. With eyes darting back and forth, peering into each dark corner of the room,
he whispers, "To 
enter the 'Black Chasm', two passwords you will need."

26. Like shadows cast by something unseen, Elven characters surround you on the
chamber's floor.

27. The tall, weathered Ranger remains in his seat, yet his powerful, clear
voice commands the 
council chamber. Casting two pieces of a broken sword upon the table, he states:
"Here is the Sword 
that was Broken, the heirloom of Elendil, founder of Gondor and Arnor, Kingdoms
of the 
Dunedain. I am Aragorn, Chieftain of the Rangers of the North, and through
Isildur, Elendil's heir. 
Years ago I aided Gandalf in his search for the Ring, and captured Gollum, the
sad demented thing 
from which Bilbo obtained the Ring. From Gollum we learned much of what had
befallen the Ring 
between those dark days of Isildur's death and Bilbo's riddle contest.
The Ring is Isildur's Bane, 
which he cut from the hand of the Enemy. Now I choose to guard and guide the
Bearer of the Ring, 
whomever it be, as far as he wishes me to go, whatever the path he chooses. For
this task, the lost 
pieces of the Sword that Was Broken must be found, and Narsil must be
reforged."

28. From untold depths a great, hot wind surges upwards, heavy with the stench
of smoke and 
brimstone. Almost at once, there is a feeling of lessened tension, like a great
weight being lifted 
from your shoulders.

29. There is no greater power in Middle-earth than the pure white flame of the
Secret Fire. This 
Flame of Anor is the Holy Spirit, Ea, that gives life to the thoughts of
lluvatar's creation. The 
Golden Wheel of Anor symbolizes lluvatar's power; it was forged from a
shard of the lamps of the 
Valar (which were destroyed by Morgoth in wars that occurred before the coming
of the elves) and 
given by Aule as a gift to the eldest of the dwarves, Durin. When Moria fell
into darkness, the 
wheel was said to be lost. Yet there are tales of a golden disk that was taken
by men into the lands 
west of Weathertop. The true purpose of the wheel is lost, though it may only be
intended as a 
symbol of the Secret Fire.

30. So fierce is your ability in battle that the remainder of your foes are
dismayed. Several minutes 
later, they press in for an attack, when the armies of Lorien arrive. The orcs
are driven into the river 
-- none return to Dol Guldur.

31. "Daro!" a commanding elven voice calls out to the Fellowship.
"Stand still! Do not move or 
speak!" Out of the shadows a ladder descends from the trees. "In these
dark times," the elven 
commander says, "we require a password."

32. "GROND"

33. Within this deep green hollow murmurs the silver stream that issues from the
fountain on the 
hill. At the bottom, upon a low pedestal, stood a basin of silver, wide and
shallow, and beside it a 
silver ewer.

34. Be not daunted by the sealed gate. Speak Friend and Enter. 

35. "Hobbits!" cries Mr. Butterbur.  "Now what does that remind
me of. And you say your name is 
Underhill?  Underhill? There's something I should remember about that name.
But one thing drives 
out another you know. It'll come back when I have time to think. Nob will
make up your rooms. 
There's a blaze in the parlour and food will be along soon "Hi!
Nob!" He shouts, "Nob! Where are 
you, you woolly-footed slowcoach." Turning back to you, he says, "If
you've any ponies, I'll have 
Bob see to it that they are taken good care of."

36. Legolas watched as Gimli slowly caught up with the rest of the Fellowship.
"If  dwarven legs 
were longer," he said, "we would not need to wait." "If
elves were more patient," Gimli replied, 
"then they would not object to waiting." "Stop!" exclaimed
Gandalf. "This is an old and tiresome 
argument. There are matters of greater interest to concern us."

37. Elrond surveyed the Council, sharp eyes undulled by the ages, appraising
each member of the 
Fellowship in turn. "Sauron, also known as Annatar, also known as Aulendil,
and Artano, and the 
Enemy, and the Abhorred, and Captain of Werewolves, was himself a servant of
Morgoth, also 
known as Melkor, also known as Bauglir, also known as the Dark Lord, also
referred to as the Great 
Dark One by the Druedain (whereas Sauron, also known as Annatar, is known as the
Dark One, but 
only in Gondor, the southernmost kingdom of the two kingdoms founded by Elendil,
son of 
Amandil, father of Anarion and Isildur), and built his Dark Tower, the
Barad-dur, in the Black 
Land, Mordor, where the orcs (also known as goblins), being composed of snagas
and uruk-hai, 
labored mightily, as Aragorn son of Arathorn, also known as Elessar the
Elfstone, Strider of the 
House Telcontar, also known as Estel, also known as Thorongil (which means
"Eagle of the Star") 
can tell you..."  Frodo slipped out quietly through a side door.

38. The halls suddenly fill with sound. The sound of an ancient conclave. The
noise of battle is all 
around you. Then, all noise ceases: and a single, bloodied axe rests upon the
floor at your feet.

39. Strider suddenly turns around, eyes glowing blood red, teeth like small
daggers. Fear paralyzes 
you. He is not a Ranger. He is of a kind that has not been seen in Middle-earth
in over two Ages -- a 
vampire! "You fools! Why else would I want you to roam the streets at
night, it is My time," he 
hisses at you. "My Lord Sauron has not forgotten us; we are few, but to him
we are valuable. All he 
wants is The Ring. Give it to me and I will thirst only upon your companions.
The choice is yours."   
Do you choose to betray your companions and give the vampire the One Ring? (Y/N)

40. Taffi tries to smile and says she'll go with you. She says her friend
Freddi Grubb fell into a cave 
and hurt himself. She wants you to keep the doggies away from her and find her
friend.

41. This is the entrance to the flet of Galadriel and Celeborn. Your advance is 
halted. "The Lady will not see you until you bring her five items: a silver
horn, a 
magic scabbard, a crown of elanor, an elfstone, and the light of Earendil's
star."

42. Silent until now, Gandalf rose, then paused, considering his words 
carefully. "Some would think that the pursuit of the Ringbearer might be
proof 
enough that this halfling's ring is of great value to the Enemy. I have
long suspected 
that the Ring that Bilbo found might indeed be the One Ring that Sauron craves.
Yet 
not until this summer did I learn the full truth of this, or the nature of our
peril. 
For Sauron is no longer our only enemy.  "Years ago, Saruman the 
White, leader of the White Council and greatest of those who are deemed wizards,

sought the secrets of the Rings, and was given this subject as his own domain to

study, and little love has he shown to those who would meddle in it. In the end,
he 
stated that the Ring had been carried by the currents of Anduin into the sea,
where it 
would rest forever. Long I believed him.
  "In June, I learned from Radagast the Brown, another of my order, that
the Nine, 
the Nazgul, were abroad, and seeking a land called "Shire" and a
hobbit named Baggins. 
Immediately, I rode to Saruman for his aid, for by his power alone had we forced

Sauron from Dol Guldur and freed Mirkwood from its evil. Never did I make a
greater 
mistake! "Saruman greeted me, and mocked me, and called himself the Wizard
of Many 
Colours. He demanded that I tell him where to find the Ring, and promised me
great 
power if I stood beside him; I refused, and was imprisoned on the top of the
great tower 
of Orthanc, Saruman's fortress. Had it not been for the great eagle,
Gwaihir, who 
rescued me, I would be there still. "Saruman has fallen to the Enemy.
Though Rivendell 
has long resisted the Enemy, we cannot long hide the Ring here, nor can we trust
that 
it will remain lost if it were cast into the Sea. The Ring must be destroyed. It

must be cast in the fires where it was made, in the furnace of Mount Doom, in 
Mordor."

43. A chill wind whistles eerily through the roughstone pillars that
ring the hilltop like a mouthful of broken fangs. Near the ring's center,
rough 
stone pillars that ring the hilltop like a mouthful of broken fangs. Near the
ring's 
center, rough stones, tumbled here and there, form a crude marker. Perhaps
someone long 
ago left something here, intending to return for it later -- much like Bilbo 
buried his troll booty beneath a cairn of stone.

44. You hear the sound of a hammer repeatedly striking against a forge.
Eventually, 
an elf with broad shoulders looks at you with a toothy grin. "I am Curudol,
pupil of 
the great Celebrimbor." he says. "Is there anything I can help you
with?"

45. At the Door of Seven Hammers, speak both the First Father's name and
then name 
the number of his people.

46. "Look for the one you seek in Archet."

47. The room reminds you of a poorly kept hobbit hole. The furnishings were once

particularly homey, but long use and poor repair has turned most into stuff
barely 
fit for firewood. Shades ofheavy hide cover the windows, keeping out any light
that 
might filter through from sun or moon. A tall dark haired man, unlike the local
Bree-
folk, rises from the table. "Please," he says with a disarming smile,
"my home is 
your home. Make yourself comfortable. You have no doubt heard tales of me by 
now. I'm certain old Butterbur has had more than enough time to bend your
ear. 
Though 'tis a wonder he can even find room for my name in that addled pate
of his.
  "My name is Rayf Brogan, and these men," he says, gesturing to
encompass some 
of the surliest rogues that you have ever seen, "are the Company of
Breeland, a nobler 
band of heroes you shall never find in these parts. We fight to keep our little
land 
free of outsiders like that unpleasant wizard whose creatures stalk the south 
downs, and those meddlesome Rangers who pry so closely into affairs that are not

their own.
  "Some call me rogue, others bandit. Many more call me friend. And I would
like to 
be your friend. Unlike most of these folk round here, you seem to have a spirit
of 
adventure about you. I need folk like you. Maybe there is something that I can
give you 
in return, eh?" It may be your imagination, but the room suddenly seems a
bit 
darker.

48. The dusty scroll gives up its secrets, "In the dark days following the
Fall of 
the Witch-King, the fortified village of Gorthad defended the northernmost
borders of 
what had once been known as Cardolan. Some maintain that the men of Cardolan
rose up 
against their liege-lord, that he had become a black sorcerer who sought to 
emulate the Witch-king. The sources of this theory support their theories with 
further theories -- that Gardeleg, that Lord of Gorthad, had taken a Black 
Book of Sorcery from the ruins of Carn Dum, and that he had purchased a Golden 
Wheel from orcs that had brought it from the depths of Moria. The men of
Cardolan 
trapped their liege-lord within his magic circle, and banished his wife, who was

allegedly a witch, into the far North.

49. "Old Gandalf were here last summer. Quite an odd fellow that Gandalf.
Said for 
me to help folk coming out of the Shire, he did. Said Butterbur would send
'em my 
way. Said I'd know 'em when they gave me their right name."

50. A man steps out of the trees. He is a tall handsome human, dressed in brown 
clothes that look travel-worn, though they have been recently washed. He has a 
rough demeanor, as though he has lived all of his life in the forest, even
though he is 
rather handsome. "It is unusual to see hobbits wandering alone in this part

of the Shire. Especially in such dangerous times. There are elves roaming this 
country, elves, and far worse than elves." 
  He notes your skeptical expression and takes a deep breath. "You need
protection 
on the road ahead. I can help you. I offer you my services." Do you accept
this 
man into the Fellowship?

51. The old man rifles through items on the shelf. "Aha!" He cackles
with joy. 
"My thanks for your help now! Take what I give you to Ham Oakbellow. He has
dire need 
of it, though he may not say so."

52. A voice whispers. "From Orin's cairn: WEST. WEST. WEST. SOUTH.
WEST. NORTH. 
WEST. NORTH."

53. This dark, stuffy shop smells of herbs and preservative spices. Odd 
little charms, and runemarked stones line shelves and hang on leather thongs
from pegs 
amongst the rafters. The shopkeeper, a heavyset, grey-haired woman reclines 
languidly in a padded chair behind the counter, slowly drawing on an oddly
carved 
briar pipe.

54. This is Daisy Proudfoot. You ask her what is what is wrong and in a
quivering 
voice she implores, "Me sister Taffy and her friend Freddi Grubb are lost
in the 
East Woods. Oh brave sirs won't 'ye please find 'em a'fore
the wolves do? Take 
Taffy to Great Road Goods, and Freddi back to his father."

55. Above the reeds there appears an old battered hat, then below it, a man all
in 
blue, save for his great yellow boots. "What's the matter then?"
he shouts. "I'm 
Tom Bombadil. Tell me your troubles. Tom's in a hurry now!"
  You explain what has happened.  "What!" shouted Tom, leaping into
the air. 
"Naught worse than that, eh? That can soon be mended. I know the tune for
him. Old 
grey Willowman. I'll freeze his marrow cold, if he don't behave
himself. I'll sing a 
wind up and blow leaf and branch away. Old Man Willow!"  Tom begins to
sing. "You 
let them out again, Old Man Willow. What be you a-thinking of? You should not 
be waking. Eat earth! Dig deep! Drink water! Bombadil is talking."
  Soon all is set right again. Bombadil invites you to his house, which lies 
across the bridge a short distance away, then vanishes.

56. Ware the Secret Flame, buried beneath the Stone of Moria. Only one who bears
the 
Holy Spirit's token shall pass through the halls with no end to bask within
its 
light.

57. "Alas!" the old river spirit cries, as great muddy tears roll down
her cheeks. 
"I may not honor your request. Magic deeper than my silty bed forbids it
'til 
spring again touches my banks. Yet there is a way. Go west to Ruddyoak. Take to
him 
a red acorn. Ask for the Springstone."

58. Erestor pauses, considers his words, then continues. "When first the
folk of Durin 
came to dwell beneath the Misty Mountains, the mightiest of their craftsmen 
created a tool of surpassing hardness and strength. Naming it Durin's Pick
after the 
First Father, the dwarves mined the depths of Khazad-dum, that is Moria, in
search 
of mithril. Though powerful, this awesome tool may have also caused their doom
when 
they delved too deep. With the fall of Moria, the Pick passed from the tales of 
Durin's Folk. Unconfirmed tales suggest that it was found by the men of
Bree."

59. The last thing anyone expected to find in this orc infested pit was a
woman's 
dressing room! Though the room is not the least bit frilly, your eyes and your 
nose do not lie.
  Gowns and travelling clothes lie strewn here and there, a thick feather bed 
shows signs of recent occupation and a lingering scent of perfume tantalizes 
the nose with subtle intrigue. Equally unfamiliar are the books and scrolls 
piled casually on the floor. An open tome reveals language unfamiliar even to
the most 
learned amongst you. Mixed thoughts race through the minds of all. Is this woman
a 
prisoner... or something more sinister?

60. Standing up, Strider seems to grow taller. "So, you seek to test my 
truthfulness." And so saying, he draws out a long, sinister sword that had
remained 
hidden until now in the dark folds of his travel-stained cloak. The blade
shimmers 
blackly, dripping dark fire. "Had I wanted to kill you before now, I could
have."
  "One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,  One Ring to bring
them all 
and in the darkness bind them  In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
  "Give me the ring and my lord Sauron may forgive your transgressions
against him. 
The Ring! Give me the Ring!" 

61. A bridge may have crossed the flood here, but it collapsed long ago.

62. The orcs have built a crude bridge to cross the chasm where Gandalf and the 
Balrog fell. In the measureless deeps below, hazy smoke now hangs, which for 
now, lies still, devoid of sound and motion.

63. Quickly, you unbind and spread out the loose pages of the scroll. Most are
filled
with heavily blacked out lines of text. None are legible. Only the last few 
words make any sense: "NAN CURUNIR", followed by today's date.

64. A particularly gnarled orc stands near the great fireplace. Its filthy 
clothing may have once belonged to some Elven lord, but are now festooned with 
unpleasant charmsthat dangle, jangle, and tangle with each other. "You 
are in the home of Drishnak of the Red Eye," the orc says in
uncharacteristically clear 
speech. "I have known you would come for some time. You know that you are
doomed. You 
cannot leave Moria without my aid. The price is small. You carry a ring. The
least of 
rings. A mere trinket." He has trouble with the word, but continues.
"I want that 
ring. Give it to me, and you may pass unharmed."

65. A ghostly voice whispers, echoing softly from the nitred walls of this
ancient 
crypt:
  "In a city of dead, Sits one who once led."
  "A ring is his bane, A barrow its fane.
  He waits til the Last,  Ask of his Past."
  The spirit's voice is heard no more in Middle-earth. 

66. Like shadows cast by something unseen, dwarvish runes surround you.

67. "Contemplate the mystery of eight:
  The wizard watches as Orc and dwarf die.
  While wolf gnaws the rotting skull dry;
  A troll eats the man served up on his plate;
  And above the eagle soars high.

68. The old man rifles through items on the shelf. "Aha!" He cackles
with joy. 
"Take what I give you to Willa Bloom. She has dire need of it, though she
may 
not say so.

69. Written in the wizard's strong but graceful script is the following
message:
  THE PRANCING PONY, BREE,
  Midyear's Day, Shire Year, 1418.
  Dear Frodo,
  Bad news has reached me here. I must go off at once. You had better leave Bag
End 
soon, and get out of the Shire before the end of July at the latest. I will
return 
as soon as I can; and I will follow you, if I find that you are gone. Leave a
message 
for me here, if you pass through Bree. You can trust the landlord (Butterbur).
You 
may meet a friend of mine on the Road; a Man, lean, dark, tall, by some called
Strider. 
He knows our business and will help you. Make for Rivendell. There I hope to 
meet again. If I do not come, Elrond will advise you.
  Yours in haste
  GANDALF.
  PS. Do NOT use It again, not for any reason whatever! Do not travel by night!
  PPS. Make sure that it is the real Strider. There are many strange men on the 
roads. His true name is Aragorn. Hmmm, I've used up all the space on this
page. I 
have another page so I will continue on it...

70. With a hushed voice, he whispers, "Seek for Trollslayer atop the Hill
of 
Fangs."

71. As you approach the cell, a short, emaciated hobbit with hollow eyes and
matted 
brown hair and beard shuffles to the bars. "You're not with
them," he rasps. "I can tell 
that, I can. Name's Appledore. Nob Appledore. I used to sell mining
equipment 
up Bree way. Ferny said to bring my best goods down here. Said they were paying 
top coin." He laughs sharply, then coughs painfully, spitting something
dark into 
the rancid straw.
  "I been living for the day when I can see ol' Ferny again."
Teeth clenched tight, 
he pauses then stares wide-eyed at you through the bars.
  "You come for the secret? Them  Orcs are digging at a secret in the cave.
Made me 
dig in the big hole too, 'til the sickness came on me. Now it's just
Orcs digging. 
There's something powerful nasty down there. Even the Orcs can sense it.
  "But, working the hole's still better'n going the way o'
Grimbosh's Black Book. 
Four of my lads went that way. Screaming powerful loud and long. Grimbosh comes
in 
here and sneers his face at me, saying he's got something special in mind
for me some 
day soon. Says "the Dark Thing" is almost ready to come up and he
needs me to 
finish things up."
  With a shudder, Nob grabs the bars, and with a hardly heard whisper sobs,
"Say. You 
folks, you're not going to leave me in here now, are you?"

72. "This is truly the darkest peril of all." Galadriel says.
"Elbereth 
protect thee! I have lore to assist thee -- remember it well, for Sauron is not
the 
only power in this world, nor is he the greatest."
  "Of all the Valar, the greatest in the art of hunting was Orome, whose
horn 
has long echoed in Middle-earth, and whose hounds were feared by all evil
creatures. 
Call upon him to ensnare one who is not easily caught...."
  "Of all of the creatures who walked in Middle-earth, the wisest of all
was Melian 
of Doriath. Call upon her wisdom to counter that which would deceive or bewitch 
thee, or those that enchant thy comrades."
  "If you wish for advice: travel the north road to Rhosgobel and seek the
aid of 
the Wizard Radagast. If he is there, he will aid you. To sustain you on your
journey, 
I have given my servants lembas, the waybread of the elves. They will share it 
with you when the need arises."
  "I will sing no songs of farewell at this hour, for I shall yet again
greet you in 
Caras Galadon." It is over. You depart Lorien, heading into the Shadow.

73. The air smells faintly of stale pipeweed. "If you folk are lookin'
for good 
pipeweed, try over at Sharkey's Shipping. They've been buying all me
best and 
most of me worst. There's not a shred of Longbottom Leaf to be had in
Bree."

74. A note on the counter reads:
  "I apologize, good folk, for the inconvenience, but my supplies are a bit
short. 
I've gone to my camp north of the Midgewater to restock before winter sets
in 
completely.
  Regards,
  Willa Bloom"

75. Seven Tribes for Seven Fathers of the Naugrim.

76. The blackness finally ends, but you can take no comfort from it. You find 
yourself in a dark throne room, complete with the symbol of an evil Eye. A 
black shadow falls upon you, and you find it difficult to breathe. A lone window
shows 
a frightful vista; an ash covered plain, and a volcano belching magma and smoke.
  "GIVE ME MY RING!" demands a voice sharp and terrible, and then you
know no more...

77. This scroll was apparently written by Gandalf, for the script 
matches other things he has written. It describes his visit to Dol Guldur, and
the 
research that was done in the library of Minas Tirith, that great city in the
south in 
Gondor.
  "...the tales of the Black Book are grim indeed. Some say it belonged to
the Witch-
king of Angmar, but others say that it could only have been written by the 
Necromancer of Dol Guldur. Gardeleg Lord of Gorthad studied it thoroughly, and
is 
said to have added many details on Moria which he learned from the orcs who 
overran Moria after the fall of Durin's folk."

78. You realize where you are -- imprisoned in the lair of a barrow wight! Your
companions are unconscious, but for the gentle rise and fall of their chests,
they look as ones dead, decked in the finery of dead kings. Across their throats
are 
long, naked, swords. A song like an incantation begins to rise:
  "Cold be hand and heart and bone,
  And cold be sleep under stone:
  Never more to wake on stony bed,
  Never, till the Sun fails and the Moon is dead.
  In the black wind the stars shall die.
  And still on gold here let them lie,
  Till the dark lord lifts his hand
  Over dead sea and withered land."

79. The dust on the floor shows that no one has disturbed the room in years. 
Your footprints are the first. "It may be that we are the first to enter
this 
chamber since Balin sealed it." To the south, a huge statue, a troll carved
of 
sturdy stone, glowers over the room.

80. With a sigh of relief, one of you notices an old bird's nest perched
behind 
one troll's ear. No living troll would have such a decoration. These must
then 
be the very three that were caught by Gandalf, quarreling over the right way to
cook 
thirteen dwarves and a hobbit! Now they are nothing but unliving stone.

81. The great book seems to open at once to something of interest. "The
Golden Wheel 
of Anor, a curious artifact once possessed by the dwarves of Khazad-dum, was
said to 
wield some power over the forces of evil.  One tale that escaped Moria's 
destruction was that of Borin, son of Bruin, who used the wheel to entrap a 
powerful spirit of evil. It is stated that Borin and comrades entombed the
spirit 
far from the Misty Mountains, near a remnant of the Old Forest.

82. The machine starts to rattle and spit and make foul noises. The steam
reminds you 
of Gandalf's fireworks. The men get up with a start, and you realize you
should get 
away before they get you. Crawling through a window, you safely escape into the 
night. There is a lot of screaming behind you, drowned out by the roar of the
huge 
engine as something explodes.

83. This is what hobbits and humans would call a tavern, except that the
occupants are 
somewhat more sedate. The minstrel Rathgil is playing a song of long ago, while
the 
elves sip ale and listen attentively.

84. Look for the one you seek in Staddle.

85. The light in here is worse that you had first thought; otherwise, you would 
have noticed that white charm hanging from a peg behind the counter.

86. The passageway goes on for a mile, or maybe a little more, and descends many

flights of stairs, at least seven. After one last turn to the left, the corridor
passes 
through a narrow door and into another hall. The air is quite warm here, even
hot!

87. Well now, here's a bit of the unexpected. The nose is a bit weatherworn
and the hat 
has seen better days, but this is most certainly meant to look like old Gandalf 
himself. What an odd place to put a statue. Perhaps some troll took a liking to
it and 
tried to take it home with him. On the other hand, perhaps there is more here 
than meets the eye?

88. "No one's supposed to know about that. Grimbosh killed the last
person who 
even mentioned it. The big boss sent the witch out to find some half folk that
was 
supposed to have heard tell of it. Personally, I think that's what they
hope to find 
in the pit. Say, what are you gonna be doing with me? Great lords like
yourselves 
wouldn't be thinking o' killing poor folk like me, would you
now?"

89. All is black, all is darkness.  One does not get a feeling of evil in this 
place. The only sound here is the echo of a great hammer striking an anvil, 
repeatedly.
  Suddenly a voice strikes out of the darkness. "We are the dead." It
is obviously a 
dwarven voice, of great power and majesty. "Long we strived to build the
mansions of 
Khazad-dum. Our arms labored to carve the stone, and find the gems, and build
our 
mansion. Now time has come, and the Enemy has struck against us, and the Naugrim

are too few to fight, though we shall do so until the last of Mahal's
children reaches 
the mansions of the dead."
  "You have come into the domain of Durin, and you have used his artifacts.

Therefore, you must do Durin's work, and make Durin's home ready to
receive 
his children once again."
  Suddenly, you are somewhere else.

90. The statue crumbles into dust and a few odd, seven-sided stone blocks. The 
passageway is no longer blocked.

91. When I was an adventurous young lad, I found this odd rock in the ruins atop
old 
Weathertop. Old Rushdock the Healer, may he rest peaceably, told me it were a 
bit o'magic from the time when kings lived hereabouts. Mayhap you folk can
use it in 
your travels?"

92. Erestor's slender hands form a small circle. "The Golden
Wheel," he intones in 
his clear voice, "was an artifact of Moria. The dwarves used it to lock the

treasure vaults in the deepest deeps, wherein the greatest treasures of the 
dwarves were stored."

93. "Hobbits!" cries Mr. Butterbur.  "Now what does that remind
me of? And you 
say your name is Baggins? Baggins? There's something I should remember
about that 
name. But one thing drives out another you know. It'll come back when I
have time to 
think. Nob will make up your rooms. There's a blaze in the parlour and food
will be 
along soon.
  "Hi! Nob!" He shouts, "Nob! Where are you, you woolly-footed
slowcoach." Turning 
back to you, he says, "If you've any ponies, I'll have Bob see to
it that they are 
taken good care of."

94. Gandalf's letter continues on this second sheet, though it shows signs 
of having been read by many others.
  "All that is gold does not glitter,
  Not all those who wander are lost;
  The old that is strong does not wither,
  Deep roots are not reached by the frost.
  From ashes a fire shall be woken,
  "A light from the shadows shall spring again;  Renewed shall be blade
that was broken,
  The crownless again shall be king.
  PPPS. I hope Butterbur sends this promptly. A worthy man, but his memory is
like a 
lumber-room: thing wanted always buried. If he forgets, I shall roast him.
  Fare Well!
  Gandalf"

95. The floor here is littered with rocks and debris. If anything is to be 
found here other than rocks, someone must dig for it. Samwise sighs heavily.
"I've 
had me an ache to work in the dirt again, but I was hoping for a bit of sunshine
and a 
cool breeze to go with it."

96. A few odd, seven-sided stone blocks lie on the dust. An intriguing
passageway 
beckons to the south.

97. The note tacked to the door reads, "If you've come in great need,
I'm sorry to 
inconvenience you, but my herb supplies are a bit short. I've gone to my
camp 
north of the Midgewater to restock before winter sets in completely.
  Regards,
  Tim Thistlewool"

98. This flet contains the library of  Lothlorien. On preserved mallorn leaves, 
delicate handwriting describes the triumphs and tragedies of elves and men 
during the long history of Middle-earth.

99. There are too few of you now. The Witch-king grabs the Ringbearer, and takes
him to 
Mordor. Sauron wins.

100. You find a scroll buried in the rubble.
  The scroll falls apart due to its age, but putting it together like a puzzle,
you 
manage to read the following: "I have discovered more... stolen by the orcs
from 
Moria. The orcs have reopened an ancient place called Gorthad, near the Downs.
It 
would appear that.... of Moria that items crafted by our ancestors.... by the
orcs 
and their masters. Many of our treasures may be in this region.... "It is
said that 
orcs have found the Golden Wheel, the most elusive of all the treasures of
Durin. 
Its use is unclear, butit is said that words are recorded... the Black Book of 
Gorthad. It is a foul name, hinting at great evils.
  "I will scour the Barrow Downs for more clues, then I will head for Bree.
This is a 
dangerous place; even the Rangers avoid it. I know enough..."
  (Signed) Thuri

101. My Dear Mr. Oldenad: Work on the new mill goes well. As you can see by my 
last shipment, the lads have been able to double our output. I'm sure the
quality 
of the work will improve soon too. Your fellows have been able to keep the local
folk 
quiet, though they don't like it much. When can I expect next payment?
  Sincerely,
  Lotho Sackville-Baggins
  Master of Bag End,
  Hobbiton.

102. "Contemplate the mystery of eight:
  A wizard watches a wolf's skull dry.
  While Orc slays dwarf and watches him die.
  A troll eats the man served up on his plate;
  and above the eagle soars high.

103. "Look for the one you seek in Combe."

104. The shop is nearly empty, its shelves bare of all but a few items.

105. The note tacked to the door reads:
  "If you've come in great need, I'm sorry to inconvenience you,
but my 
herb supplies are a bit short. I've gone to my camp deep in the Midgewater
to 
restock before winter sets in completely. You may find me there for the next
week or 
so.
  Regards,
  Tim Thistlewool"

106. In this flet, an elven maid with soft black hair hums as she turns thread
on a 
spinning wheel. She notices you and nods. "I am the seamstress
Tinalin," she 
says. "I sit and weave and make new things. This cape, do you like
it?"

107. A voice whispers. "From Throri's cairn. WEST. SOUTH. EAST. SOUTH.
EAST. NORTH."

108. Elrond casts the last shredded cloak aside. "Though you have accounted
for but 
eight of the Nazgul, we can delay no longer. Against the Enemy's nine
riders, I shall 
send forth nine walkers. Along with the Ringbearer and his companion, Gandalf
will 
go, for this shall be his great task, and perhaps the end of his Labours. For
the 
rest, they should represent the other Free Peoples of the World; Elves, Dwarves,
and 
Men. Legolas shall be for the Elves and Gimli for the Dwarves.  For men, take
with 
you Boromir, a valiant man of Minas Tirith in Gondor.
  "Elf lords I could send with you, but they would only serve to draw the
attention 
of the Enemy. I cannot force any of these valiant heroes to join you, therefore,
chose 
those who may best aid you in your quest.
  "Your path lies south of here, through Redhorn Pass and into the forest
of 
Lothlorien. My folk have been instructed to give what aid they can, though some
may 
still require a token in return. If my kinfolk question you, use my name as 
their answer. To Gandalf I give miruvore, a powerful cordial, to help you in
cold 
weather. Use it wisely. And lastly, I give you a single word. You will know when
to 
use it. That word is 'mellon'".

109. Thickly woven strands of sticky, silken webbing block the exit.

110. The floor here is littered with rocks and debris. If anything is to be 
found here other than rocks, someone must dig for it...

111. When the thick dust settles so that everyone can again see, you discover
that 
amongst the odd-shaped chunks of rubble are seven, seven-sided stone blocks.
Each of 
the blocks is carved with the runes of the dwarf language, though even the most 
knowledgeable among you cannot decipher their meaning.

112. "Well now. Unless I am no judge of good foodstuffs, these fine bits of
fungus are 
the same as the Scarlet Shelves that old Farmer Maggot used to grow. Fine 
eating they are." Nevertheless, the other members of your party seem 
less certain about your evaluation.

113. Noses wrinkle at the smell of dust and mildew. Though the walls are lined 
with tall, wide bookshelves, possibly rescued long ago from some ancient
lord's 
manor, few are the books and scrolls to be found filling those shelves. The most

common topic is "the History of Bree", whose shelves run a slim lead
over "Cuisine of 
Bree", which in its own turn has but one or two more folios than the nearly
bare 
shelf labelled "Everything Else".

114. "He's the orcs' leader. A powerful sorcerer he is. Knows
magic that would turn 
your insides out he does!" His voice drops to a conspiratorial whisper.
"We 
all hate him. If you look to extinguish his dark fire, take the stair near the 
Barrows to his lair. Don't forget to use the right passwords to foil his
traps."

115. Thadred, fourth Cardolani lord of Amon Sul died of a broken heart on the 
eve of what would have been his wedding. His lady, Luthanna and all her 
handmaids had been killed but days before in an Orc attack as she rode southward
to join 
Thadred in marriage. Those who entered the Lord's vault in later years
would speak of 
hearing faint weeping and sobbing and of feeling an ache for loved ones lost or 
distant.

116. "Mr. Frodo, sir!" Sam exclaims. Frodo turns to Sam, only slightly
irritated with 
his friend. "Sam, we must get the Ring to Mount Doom at all costs."
  "I know, Mr. Frodo, I know it, we will. But there's something
important we've 
forgotten, and it has to be said!"
  "What is it, Sam?"

117. A note from Bilbo says: "must ask the Brandybucks about Old
Forest." You put 
this down for a copy of something far more interesting, the Lay of 
Leithan, the song of Beren and Luthien. It says that Luthien danced by the
shores 
of the river Esgaldil whenthe world was young, and some of the waters of
Middle-earth 
still remember her. In places where the elves still dwell, her memory will stir
the
waters to a powerful defense, even against the mightiest of foes.

118. This flet is one of Lorien's guard posts, cunningly hidden in the tree

branches. A tall strong elf, obviously one of the commanders of Lorien, looks 
at you and introduces himself as Celebrith, son of Dagnos.

119. Upon an altar, you see a large black tome, covered in thick leather
binding. It is 
open, and a footstool at the base of the pedestal should allow even a hobbit to
read 
it, though it is shrouded in a palpable feeling of Evil.

120. Pippin feels curiously attracted by the well. While the others busy
themselves in 
the chamber, he creeps over to the edge of the well and peers over. A chill air
seems 
to strike his face, rising from invisible depths. Moved by a sudden impulse, he 
gropes for a loose stone, and lets it drop. His heart beats many times before
there is 
any sound. Then, far below, as if the stone had fallen into deep water in some 
cavernous place, there came a plunk, very distant, but magnified and repeated in
the 
hollow shaft.

121. Carved into the floor, in a large area free of dust, are the words
"For Durin's 
Child, a sharp eye will show the way."

122. The ring of hammers falls silent as you enter. Dark evil faces, sweating in

light of fiery forges, glare at you menacingly. As one, the huge Uruks drop
their 
hammers, tongs, and bellows to take up the weapons that they have been forging.

123. "The Ringbearer has a dream. He sees a small brown bird wing its way
to a great 
eagle's eyrie. Amid thunderclashes, the eagle flies to a great tower within

a circle, sweeping down and bearing away a white-haired man. "Say !ANGMAR
to the 
stone apart!" he cries.

124. The dwarven masons of old were true masters of stone, and though much of 
their skill has undoubtedly been lost through the ages, enough remained for
Balin's 
folk to block up a secret door and make it appear as natural stone. So sturdy is

the construction that it is impassable to all but the mightiest stone
mason's 
tools.

125. You hear an answer to your cry, a song that echoes through the walls of the

barrow:
  "Old Tom Bombadil is a merry fellow,
  Bright blue his jacket is and his boots are yellow, 
  None have caught him yet, for Tom, he is the master,
  His songs are stronger songs, and his feet are faster."
  Tom Bombadil appears. He begins to sing again:
  "Get out you old Wight! Vanish in the Sunlight!
  Shrivel like the cold mist, like the winds go wailing,
  Out into the barren lands far beyond the mountains!
  Come never here again! Leave your barrow empty!
  Long and forgotten be, darker than the darkness,
  Where gates stand forever shut, till the world is mended."
  At these words, there is a long trailing shriek, fading away into an
unguessable 
distance, and after that silence. You are free.

126. This flet is one of Lorien's guard posts, cunningly hidden in the tree

branches. A tall strong elf, obviously one of the commanders of Lorien, looks 
at you and introduces himself as Malkir, son of Seregon.

127. From a tattered tome, you read "Moria, the Black Chasm, Khazad-dum in
the 
tongue of Dwarves, was a great dwarven city deep beneath the Misty Mountains. 
Great stairs...."

128. "Then, of course, there is the blade Narsil, the sword once belonging
to 
Elendil, mighty Numenorean king of Gondor in the south. Narsil was broken in
four 
pieces when Isildur clove the Ring from Sauron's finger. When
Isildur's Bane is at 
last discovered, the sword will be reforged anew and made whole. This may indeed

be difficult, for over the course of centuries other small pieces have
disappeared 
from the sword; a broken piece of the blade, a wing-like crossguard, and a 
magnificent jewel from its hilt. Aragorn bears this sword."

129. Gharsh, the Orc overlord, eyes you warily. Durin's Axe lies hidden on
a 
platform in the Hall of Mists. Speak the mighty words Flame of Udun to break the

spell that holds it in place.

130. Weathertop, the southernmost of the Weather Hills near Bree was once the 
site of Amon Sul, an ancient fortress destroyed by the forces of the Witch-king.

There are said to be crypts and caverns beneath its ruins, though not even the 
Rangers know the way to find them.

131. "Look! Someone has been here recently," Strider comments.
"There are signs of 
a fight. The ground is scorched here, here, there -- and, what is this?"
Stooping, 
he traces a rune freshly scribed on a flat rock that had escaped the fire.
"G," he 
whispers, "Gandalf's personal signature. It may be that he has been
here quite recently 
and was forced to defend himself. If only he had time to tell us more."

132. West of the Barrow Downs lies the last remnants of the Old Forest, that
once 
stretched from the Western mountains to the Misty Mountains. This dark forest 
is home to many spirits of the world, both good and evil. Therein dwells the 
eldest, called IarwainBen-adar by the elves.

133. Rack upon rack of bottles line the walls. Most are surprisingly free of
dust 
and cobwebs. The vintage wines represent more than one Age of Middle-earth,
samples 
of over a thousand vineyards. Some like Old Winwards take your mind back across
the 
leagues to the Shire. Others, their names marked in languages unknown now
amongst 
the folk of Middle-earth, no longer even evoke memories of the soil that warmed
the 
roots of their vines, or of the people who first drank them. Even in their 
antiquity, none seem spoiled.

134. "A staff seemingly made of pure ice is said to be lost beneath the
ruins 
northeast of Bree. The staff is said to have great powers over fire spirits,
even those 
as powerful as the legendary Balrog."

135. As you enter, characters on the wall begin to glow until they are quite
legible. 
The script is obviously Gandalf's. It reads: "I hope you find this.
The evil ones 
have driven me underground for now. Do not tarry here, for they love the dark. 
Remember the name of Elbereth, for it has power over them. They are coming. I 
must flee deeper to escape them -- Gandalf."

136. You enter the gate of Caras Galadon, the city of the trees. No folk can you

see, but there are many voices about you. In the distance, you hear the sound 
of singing falling from on high like soft rain upon the leaves. It is a wondrous

place.

137. Elrond speaks. "Here my friends is the Ringbearer. Few have ever come
hither 
through greater peril or on an errand more urgent. There is much to be told and
each 
should be heard. Let the Council of Elrond begin."

138. The dwarven runes on the floor here are incomprehensible.

139. Gharsh whines, "Tell the great troll statue a certain word. Tell it,
'ITHILDIN'."

140. The shining figure calls out, "Ai na vedui Dunadan! Mae
govannen!" His speech and 
clear ringing voice leaves no doubt in your hearts:  this is one of the
Elven-folk. No 
others that dwelt in the wide world had voices so fair to hear. "This is
Glorfindel
who dwells in the house of Elrond," Strider says.

141. The door appears to be locked.

142. As you enter, characters on the wall begin to glow until they are quite
legible. 
The script is obviously Gandalf's. It reads: "I hope you find this.
The evil ones 
have driven me underground for now. My spells will hold them, but not for long.
Do 
not tarry here, for they love the dark. Remember the name of Elbereth, for it
has power 
over them. What little aid I give you in two new names: !LUTHIEN summons aid
over 
water, !MITHRANDIR over fire. Use them wisely. They come now and I must flee
deeper 
ere I see the light of Arda once more. Gandalf."

143. A slender bridge of stone spans the black chasm in a single curving span of

fifty feet. Beyond the fire to the west, hundreds of black figures swarm
angrily. 
They brandish spears and scimitars which shine red as blood in the firelight.
The 
rolling thunder of the drumbeats, grows louder and louder -- doom, doom... doom,

doom! Arrows begin falling around you. To the west, dark silhouettes of trolls
place 
great slabs of stone across the fire. Yet, before they can cross a spasm of fear

breaks like a wave against the companions of the Ring... the Balrog has come,
wrapped 
in flame and darkness.

144. In the clear, ringing voice of the elven-folk, Glorfindel speaks. "I
was 
sent from Rivendell to look for you. We feared you were in danger upon the
Road."
  "Then Gandalf has reached Rivendell?"
  "No. He had not when I departed; but that was nine days ago. We heard
news
of your coming from Gildor and his people, whom you met beyond the Brandywine.
  "It was I who left the elfstone upon Bridge over the Mitheithel when I
drove off 
the servants of Sauron who held it. Yet I fear that even more that the Nine are
near, 
both behind and ahead. Once the Black Riders find your trail upon the Road, they

will ride after us like the wind."

145. The Black Book is a mighty tool of sorcery, yet it should not be handled by

the weak of will. Also within it are dire secrets about Moria, which the dwarves
call 
Khazad-dum. Fire is its bane.

146. The stone lid here is sealed tightly. It would be impossible to fit even a 
prybar into the cracks.

147. A ghost hovers here, noble in bearing, yet wearing a sadness deeper than
any you 
have known. You sense no evil, but nevertheless, a deep chill runs down your 
spines as it whispers in hollow tones. "In life, I was Thadred, one of many
Lords of 
Amon Sul who have ruled this place over the centuries. Long ago, I gave my heart
to 
a maiden fair, Luthanna. Yet never was our love to be, for the servants of the
Witch-
king took her spirit where none can reach. Love! It slew me more surely than all
the 
arrows of Angmar. I sat in a tower, with armies at my command. Through the Stone
of 
Seeing, I could behold all that occurred in my domain, and beyond. I had the
wealth 
of kings. But this meant nothing to me. I could not fight for Luthanna, I could 
not see Luthanna in the Stone, and all my wealth and power could not buy her
back.
  "Now, I watch over the dead.  Though the dead cannot know love, my dead
heart yet 
craves to know of love. None may pass until they give proof of a maiden's
love."

148. After climbing a great height, you find yourself in a large hall, set amid
the 
branches of the tallest mallorn in Caras Galadon. On two chairs beneath the bole

of the tree and canopied by living boughs sit Lord Celeborn and Lady Galadriel.

149. I am Boromir, son of Denethor, who is Steward over Gondor. I have come
North 
seeking the answer to a dream which has plagued me. In that dream, I thought the
eastern 
sky grew dark, and there was a growing thunder, but in the West a pale light
lingered, 
and out of it I heard a voice, remote but clear, crying:
  Seek for the Sword that was broken.
  In Imladris it dwells;
  There shall counsels be taken
  Stronger than Morgul spells.
  There shall be shown a token
  That Doom is near at hand,
  For Isildur's Bane shall waken,
  And the Halfling forth shall stand.
  What is the Sword that was broken? What or who was Isildur's Bane?"

150. Deep beneath his tower on the downs, Gardelag lord of Gorthad hid the
glowing 
sword that his warriors had taken from the band of Orcish bandits returning from
the 
sack of Khazad-dum.

151. Hidden within the fastness of the troll cave is an elven scroll. You
don't 
know how it got here -- and you don't want to know. The scroll is battered
and 
beaten, and mostly unreadable. The only surviving inscription refers 
to Rivendell: "Imladris's deeps beyond vintages lie."

152. Greatest of the swords of Middle-earth is Anglachel, the Sword of the Dark
Elf 
Eol. It was forged by Telchar of Nogrod, and was believed lost in the Fall of
Gondolin. 
Yet the Black Blade escaped capture, and was taken to Moria as a reward by the 
dwarves who aided the Valar in the final battle against Morgoth. There it was
wielded 
by Nain, son of Durin VI, until Durin's Bane drove the dwarves from Moria.
It was 
taken by dwarves from the sack of Moria, but none know where it rests.

153. The wretched creature snarls "Tell the gray dwarves MORIA."
Though it may cost 
you greatly, you stand by your word and let it scamper off into the darkness.

154. Your torchlight gleams dully off a rusty knife hanging on the red-brown
rock 
wall near the sleeping figure. Without sharp eyes you might have might have 
missed it hanging there.

155. This is an old elven keep. However, the workmanship is clearly 
dwarven; obviously it dates back to the days in Eregionwhen the elven smiths and
the dwarf lords of Moria formed a great (but now long sundered) friendship.

156. Upon the throne is a being that resembles a human sculpture made out of mud

from a river bank. This is the mighty Withywindle, the spirit of the river. She
says 
in a slow, deep voice: "I know of you and your quest. Yet who bids you to
take 
lilies from my secret place? Show me a token, so I may understand."

157. "A staff seemingly made of pure ice is said to be lost in a cave
within the Old 
Forest. The staff is said to have value against fire spirits, even those as 
powerful as the legendary Balrog."

158. "So." Smaug said, licking his lips (or the draconian equivalent).
"You 
must indeed be a simpleton to think that something as trivial as an arrow could 
slay a dragon such as myself, regardless of its color. Now, I smell something
familiar, a 
scent similar to one who stole my cup -- a relative, perhaps?"

159. In a happier age, the Elves of Eregion were mighty smiths, creators of many

wondrous magical items. Chief amongst these smiths was Celebrimbor. He created
many 
rings of power, untainted by Sauron's corruption. One of these, called the
Smith's 
Ring, was imbued with a fraction of Celebrimbor's own skill. Though Eregion
fell 
and Celebrimbor died, his skill lived on this ring, passed down from smith to 
smith. At last it was carried into the Old Forest by Dunedain fleeing the great 
plague. Its owner died from an orc's arrow as he crossed the River
Withywindle, and 
the Smith's Ring was never seen again.

160. A slender bridge of stone spans the black chasm in a single curving span of

fifty feet. Beyond the fire to the west, hundreds of black figures swarm
angrily. 
They brandish spears and scimitars which shine red as blood in the firelight.
The 
rolling thunder of the drumbeats, grows louder and louder -- doom, doom... doom,

doom! Arrows begin falling around you. To the west, dark silhouettes of trolls
place 
great slabs of stone across the fire. Yet before they can cross, a spasm of fear
breaks 
like a wave against the companions of the Ring... the Balrog has come, wrapped
in 
flame and darkness.
  "Fly! This is a foe beyond any of you!" Gandalf cries. Only the full
power of a 
wizard might stand against it. Might.

161. "Though your task will be difficult, I feel that the right choice has
been made 
here today." Elrond states. "Yet before the journey of the Ring can
begin, we must 
know of the fate of the Black Riders, and learn more of the Enemy's plans.
Therefore, 
gather the mightiest of heroes and scout the land. Bring me proof of their 
destruction. Consider too that the lands around us may yield secrets and
treasures 
to aid you in your journey. Range far, range wide, but return here once
more."

162. My Dear Mr. Oldenad:  Tell your lads to let up on us. After all, it's
their 
fault, not mine, that the wretched machine got broken. It would still be working
if 
they had been about their tasks better. The local folk are getting a bit uppity
too. 
Perhaps you can send a few more fellows to keep the peace. When can I expect my 
next payment?
  Sincerely,
  Lotho Sackville-Baggins, 
  Master of Bag End,
  Hobbiton.

163. The statue of the dwarf here seems out of place in such a grand hall, yet
the 
nobility and strength of character depicted by the stonecarver's hands seem
to 
radiate confidence and serenity. The stone murals upon the walls show an 
injured dwarf receiving the ministrations of a dwarven healer.

164. This passage seems to refer to the Shire. "Amonar, the younger son of
Arveleg of 
Arthedain, took as his fief that lands west of the River Baranduin, and held
them in 
the name of his brother, King Araphor, swearing an oath to avoid the kin-strife
that had 
harmed the sons of Isildur. But there was little love between them, and Amonar 
honored his oath, when he chose to, late and with little support. But in the 
final battle, rebuked by his liege-lord, he was stirred to wild action, and he
and his 
guard were slain by the Witch-king. His dying words were an affirmation of his 
oath to the kings of Arnor for eternity. He was entombed in a cave overlooking
his 
lands."

165. The black halls of Moria continue to ring with the shattering echoes of
slamming 
doors. From outside, a noise of rending and crashing comes dully through the
ponderous 
stone. It comes to you that the sounds tell of the destruction of the great 
holly trees that once flanked its western gate -- a pity, since the trees were 
beautiful and had stood so long. Whoever was its master and whatever its intent,
the 
crashing boulders confirm that the way behind you is now sealed by the creature 
from the waters. The Fellowship's only paths lie ahead, into the depths of 
Moria.

166. After all that, all you find is an odd black key, and a crumbling scroll.
As you 
unroll the scroll, you glimpse the two words "DURIN'S BANE"
before it 
crumbles into dust.

167. Green vapours belch forth from the crevice, swirling and eddying about the
chamber.
A cold hollow voice echoes: "At last I am free to do my master's
bidding once more!" The gas 
overwhelms you, and all is darkness...

168. A robust but ruffled-looking hobbit stares back at you. "Pleased to me
you. My 
name is Bushdock, Ned Bushdock. I hope you folk don't want me to go on no 
adventures, least not right aways. Only hobbits can fit where these folks and
Rayf 
wanted me to go."

169. Shadowy figures startle you as you descend the steps into the dimly lit
cellar. 
Yet, upon closer looks, they are nothing more than cleverly crafted statues of 
dwarves.

170. Long ago, the dwarves of Khazad-dum used this room to make steel. The fires
have 
long since ebbed, leaving a forge as the only reminder of what was once here.
You feel 
that all is not as it should be in this place. Dwarven runes decorate the forge.

171. Old bones, great empty jars and broken pots litter the floor of this gloomy
old 
cave. "Surely this is a troll-hole, if ever there was one!" one of you
comments. 
"Let us leave and get away, now that we know who made the path outside. We
better get 
off it quick!" Nonetheless, there is something hidden among the bones... 

172. A chill settles on the party and the light flickers but does not fail. A
hollow 
voice, half-heard yet fully clear, whispers. "I sense one of the folk of
Bilbo here. 
Maybe even of his noble line."
  "True, Ori." a second voice chimes in. "Yet they will have to
prove themselves ere 
we tell them much." There are no creatures visible here, not even a ghost.
  "If they don't survive the crossing," the first voice replies,
"then they will be 
of no use to us at all my good Oin."
  "Hmmph! I still say we need proof that they serve not the Shadow."
  "Orcfeathers!"
  "Oh shave your beard!"
  The chill passes and you cast glances amongst one another. Surely the 
oppressive darkness has begun to drive you mad.  Without warning the chill 
returns. "Words of Power are needed it's true and some words mean more
than life to 
you. Yet one word alone means much to us, who did the Burglar befriend."
  "That didn't rhyme! 'Tis terrible doggerel you make."
  "Hush, I'm not done. Where was I. Ah ... 'Yet one word alone
means much to us, who 
did the Burglar befriend. Um ... Seek it in a fireplace, to speak it and our
sorrow 
end.' There, wagglebeard, does that appease you?"
  "Beware, I sense our master. We must return ere he finds us absent."
  Once again, the chill passes and you are alone beneath the stone of Moria.

173. The sounds of your digging echo through the halls. The going is 
labourous, but you are obviously making headway.

174. The apparition of a great dwarf appears, rising in a vision of a smoke from

the forge. The dwarves fall to their knees -- surely this must be Durin, father
of all 
dwarves! "Find my axe!" he commands. "Use it to destroy the Dark
Lord!"

175. In the center of a swirling pool is a stone figure of a once-proud eagle, 
standing silent on a solitary isle. Its wings have been shorn from its body, and
its 
eyes are covered with mud. The water looks too swift to safely swim.

176. The narrow passage behind the hidden door goes on for nearly a mile or so, 
continually rising up stairs until at last, it opens upon a larger chamber.

177. The statue of the dwarf here seems out of place in such a grand hall, yet
the 
nobility and strength of character depicted by the stonecarver's hands seem
to 
radiate confidence and serenity. The bas-relief stone murals depict the death 
of a dwarven hero, and then surprisingly, his return to life again at the hands
of a 
healer. Great were the powers of the First Fathers! Yet even they could not
prevent 
their own deaths. Return to life was granted by the Valar only in times of
greatest 
need and only for the greatest heroes of their Age. An equally great sacrifice 
was often required of the being who was granted life again.

178. The barrier shatters, fragments of stone flying in all directions to reveal
a 
small opening into a dark passageway beyond. One large stone remains. Carved
into it 
is a message: "Ask a question of the creator of the Naugrim ere you pass
beyond."

179. Tom's wife, the beautiful Goldberry, is here. She is lying in bed,
ill. 
Beside her, a blackened willow leaf floats in a bowl of stinking water. "My

lilies..." she whispers. "My special pool lies south of this house.
Please... bring 
me lilies. Take this token and whatever you may need from this house." She
offers 
you her token, a golden leaf pasted against oak bark.

180. A statue of a dwarven craftsman stands here, his arm raised in the air,
poised 
to deliver a skilled blow to some object on his work table.

181. Your feet disturb a deep dust on the floor, and you stumble among things
lying in 
the doorway whose shapes you cannot, at first, make out. A table in the middle
of the 
room, a great oblong block of white stone, is carved with dwarf-runes, deeply
graven. 
"It's like a tomb." one of you comments. Brushing aside the dust,
you read 'BALIN, 
SON OF FUNDIN, LORD OF MORIA'. "He is dead, then," another of you
comments. "I 
feared it was so.'
  Upon closer examination, the room reveals its secrets. "This is
'Mazarbul,' the Hall 
of Records of old. We have come too high. We are on the seventh
level."  To the east, a small passageway opens upon a stair that leads
sharply down. All 
around you are the signs of ancient battle -- broken swords and axe-heads,
cloven 
shields and helms. Whatever was once here is now gone and plundered.

182. You have entered the library of Bag End. There are many books of hobbit
lore, as 
well as several volumes of elven lore from Rivendell. You loathe the idea of
Lotho 
fingering Bilbo's beloved books, but somehow doubt that Lotho Pimple has
the 
imagination or curiosity to ever look at them.

183. The air in this mighty hall is hot, very hot. The great hall is lit with a 
fierce, fiery red light. Down its center stalk a paired row of towering columns.
They are 
carved like the boles of mighty trees whose boughs uphold the rough with 
branching tracery of stone. At the base of two of the columns, a great fiery 
fissure has opened. Flames crackle and dance from its depths. You have come upon

the eastern end of the great hall. Hopefully, the fire lies between you and your

pursuit.

184. Not since the days of Angband has the world known such cold. Ages ago, an
evil 
spirit entered the Misty Mountains and begrudged all creatures who travelled on 
his slopes, for it viewed the mountains as its own personal property. And as the
ages 
passed, the spirit of Caradhas grew colder and colder, and it begrudged all 
warmth, and plotted to destroy it. And so the spirit Caradhas captured some of
the 
warmth of spring, in the form of a bird, and imprisoned it in a cage of ice.
Since then, 
the mountains have been subject to the unchallenged will of Caradhas, and its 
malice has grown as great as its might. This cave is the dwelling place of cruel

Caradhas, spirit of the Redhorn; imprisoned in a pack of ice is the bird of
spring. 
The great coldness seems shocked that anyone would dare challenge it.
"Fool!" it 
hisses like blowing snow rolling upon ice. "Dare you to challenge the power
of the 
winterchill?" It howls like a blizzard. "First you climb my slopes,
now you invade my 
home? Die!" the voice growls like breaking ice.

185. Though nothing here would indicate the presence of evil, an overwhelming 
dread grips you, nearly forming itself into abject terror.

186. With resounding splashes, each member of the Fellowship strikes the 
surface of the dark swirling waters below. Darkness closes over you and
consciousness 
fades.

187. You have come to the site of a recent battlefield. Many orcs lie dead, but
the
elves who fought here were all slain -- save one.   "The orcs have an 
encampment... swamp." The elf is clearly dying from many wounds; nothing
can save his 
life. "They must be killed... before they can set up a camp. Unless you do
so now... 
the quest might never cross the...."
  With that, the elf gives his last breath.

188. On this piece of grass a young elf maid sits. She is not frightened of you,
but 
your presence has not changed her melancholy demeanor. "I sit in the
shadows," she 
says, "and I think of the Great Shadow to come. Lorien is doomed. The
Shadow has 
won."

189. "And if I were after the Ring, I could have it -- NOW!"
  Standing up, Strider seems to grow taller. "I am the real Strider. I am
Aragorn, 
son of Arathorn; and if by life or by death I can save you, I will." And so
saying, 
he draws out a sword that had remained hidden until now in the folds of his
travel 
stained cloak. The blade had been broken off about a foot below the hilt, its
hilt 
lacked a gem, and one of the wing shaped cross guards was missing. "Not
much use, is 
it? But the time is near when it shall be reforged anew."
  "A light from the shadows shall spring; 
  Renewed shall be blade that was broken,
  The crownless again shall be king."

190. In the bottom of Grimbosh's chest is a scroll. You read it carefully:
  "I am interested in several matters in your area. I understand that the
Golden 
Wheel may be near; it must be obtained. Any weapon of such power will be useful
against 
my Enemy, not to mention essential in finding Durin's Axe.
  "As for the voices in the stone circles that you reported, I am also 
interested in that. Try dropping items deliberately in the circle and record the

voices that you hear. It may provide clues to the halls of Khazad-dum, which I
have not 
visited since before the coming of Durin's Bane.
  "Your obedience is essential. Do not make enemies. As for that other 
matter, *SHE* is handling that. Keep your ears open, but do not meddle with it 
unless it comes to your doorstep. The use of force may attract the Nine Riders, 
and They must be avoided at all costs!
  "I am pleased with your work to date. Tell Oldenad not to bother me with
non-
essentials; the shipping company is only a matter of minor amusement to me, of 
little consequence in my overall plans." ---S
  The scroll is emblazoned with the symbol of a White Hand.

191. The elf lifts himself painfully, and begins his tale.
  "A few weeks ago, I had strange dreams of a glowing bird trapped in a
cage of 
ice. Everywhere around it was ice. It was obvious the bird was trapped, and
needed my 
help."
  He groans, and then continues.
  "The dreams did not stop, so I sought the guidance of Galadriel. She
brought me to 
her Mirror and we saw a secret passageway in the eastern part of the Redhorn 
Pass. We saw a huge monster, made of ice, with the bird from my dreams
imprisoned in 
ice. The ice monster seemed to draw strength from the bird, which it used to 
increase the power of the winters in the mountains.
  "I immediately asked Galadriel to give me permission to battle this 
monster, but she refused, saying that no elf of Lorien was destined to prevail 
against it. The dreams did not come again, but still I could not forget this. So
I 
left, alone, for the Redhorn. There I was attacked by orcs and injured, and so I
came 
back to Lorien."
  "If the orcs of the Misty Mountains have sealed Redhorn Pass, then both
Rivendell and 
Lorien are in peril. If the spirit of Caradhas, as Galadriel has named this 
monster, grows stronger, then eventually it will bring the cold of Morgoth upon
us all. 
It must be defeated. Redhorn Pass must be freed."

192. Though your own light is dim and feeble, countless facets in the sparkling
walls 
reflect and intensify its light until it seems you stand in bright daylight. 
Mithril! Here, countless years ago, the dwarves of Moria delved for the precious

metal. And here, too, did they unleash Durin's Bane.

193. Oin's spectral voice whispers. "From Dwili's cairn. WEST.
NORTH. EAST. 
NORTH. EAST. NORTH."

194. In the section marked Other, you find the following entry in a book
entitled 
"Hobbit Life in Bree." Weathertop, the southernmost of the Weather
Hills near 
Bree was once the site of Amon Sul, an ancient fortress destroyed by the forces
of 
the Witch-king. There are said to be crypts and caverns beneath its ruins,
though 
they were sealed by the Witch-king of Angmar, and only the use of the same 
magic word that he used to seal the caverns can counter his spell. There are
rumored 
to be other entrances into the caverns within the ruins of Weathertop, but none
of 
Bree has ever confirmed this. One notable feature of Weathertop is the Lonely 
Stone, believed to have been placed by the survivors of Witch-king as a burial
marker 
to honor the dead slain by the Witch-king in those ancient wars.
  The Stone Alone was honored in a prophecy made by the famed Seer Malbeth:
  When Isildur's Doom Awake,
  And Its lost bearer Dreams,
  Then the Stone Alone shall shake,
  To find a Broken Wing.
  Reforged shall be a shattered sword
  The hope of the Dunedain;
  The weak shall overthrow the Lord
  Destroyed shall be the Bane.
  A scribbled footnote says: 
"As usual with Malbeth's prophecies, no one can truly understand a
word of them."

195. Six statues of dwarven warriors stand guard here. They look like they could

speak, but then what would you say in return? Nevertheless, deep inside, 
you feel a disquietness. There is something more to these finely crafted statues

than just stone. Could it have something to do with the dark discolorations on
the 
warriors' weapons?

196. The brown bird spreads its wings. For a moment, you have the impression of
a 
face; like Gandalf's, maybe a bit younger. A voice comes from the bird,
speaking
in the Common Tongue:
  "If you have not found the elves, seek them at night on the roads leading
to Green 
Hill Country. Ask them about Elbereth, for her name has the power to protect
you, as 
will the name of Luthien. But that one you will not learn there."
  "The Old Forest is long and hard and dangerous, but the Enemy will not
follow you 
there. Seek the Master of the Forest. Call for help in dire need."
  "Gandalf! Gandalf!" Then the bird is gone.

197. The air seems to shatter around you as a hollow voice shrieks in anger!
Dark forms 
shamble from the shadows as the air temperature continues to drop. Evil hangs in
the 
air like smoke. Cold chuckling voices murmur of death, darkness, and doom.

198. "Athelwyn!" you cry, and the final note echoes through the
chamber. But it is no 
use. She is gone. "We must make certain her sacrifice was not in
vain." you say, 
holding back the tears.

199.  The scroll is dated a hundred years ago and says: "The fortress of
Dol Guldur 
is ten levels tall, from its deepest pit to its tallest tower. Within its
fortress 
are many orcs, and dark magicks, but its most terrifying occupant is the 
Necromancer, who is indeed Sauron of Mordor, given new shape again. I urge the
White 
Council to press for an assault; it is to be hoped that the revelation will make

Saruman less intractable." The scroll is signed "G", obviously
the symbol of 
Gandalf.

200. The one standing alone is Gloin, an old king of Durin's folk. The
others are 
dwarven warriors, probably heroes, though you cannot put a name to their faces.
Deep 
inside, you feel a disquietness. There is something more that you 
should remember about such finely crafted statues. Could it have something to do
with 
the dark discolorations on the warriors' weapons?

201. As the grey mists and your heads clear, you find yourselves in a dark
columned 
chamber. The means by which you came is not apparent. Nor is there any obvious
way to 
go back the way you came. Meanwhile, dark passages beckon from all directions.

202. Oin's spectral voice whispers. "From Buri's cairn. WEST.
SOUTH. EAST. SOUTH. 
EAST. NORTH. WEST."

203. Here in the nitre-coated crypt wall, the dust collects upon an empty stone
shelf. 
The carvings beneath indicate that this bier has been reserved for Pelissar, a 
Prince of the Dunedain.

204. As you enter, characters on the wall begin to glow until they are quite
legible. 
The script is obviously Gandalf's. It reads: "I hope you find this.
The evil ones 
have driven me underground for now. My spells will hold them, but not for long.
Do 
not tarry here, for they love the dark. Remember the name of Elbereth, for it
has power 
over them. What little aid I give you is a new name !LUTHIEN, which summons aid 
over water. Use it wisely. They come now and I must flee deeper ere I see the
light of 
Arda once more. Gandalf."

205. The old man rifles through items on the shelf. "Aha!" He cackles
with joy. 
"Take what I give you to my nephew Nob. I'm certain your gift was his
idea. And take 
this for yourselves now."

206. Some in your party are more affected than others. Standing apart, they gaze

awestruck at the wonder of the Mithril ore. All other concerns seem trivial in
this 
great and wonderful place.

207. With the dirt and rubble brushed aside, deep runes can be read in the rock
floor. 
The simple characters state: "With the Sign of Seven, Durin's Axe may
be regained."

208. The dark form that is crossing the narrow bridge is recognizable as
Durin's Bane, 
the slayer of Durin VI. It was this creature that drove the dwarves from Moria,
and 
has haunted the memory of all dwarves ever since. You are doomed.

209. The great hall is dark. Down its center stalk a paired row of towering 
columns. They are carved like the boles of mighty trees whose boughs uphold the
roof 
with a branching tracery of stone. At the base of two of the columns, a great
fissure 
has opened. Lazy plumes of smoke float gently upwards to lose themselves in the 
darkness. 

210. This huge doorway has a swan shaped keyhole, about which the word
"FINARFIN" is 
written in elven script.

211. After all that, all you find is a crumbling skull. The scroll has two words

carved into it. "DURIN'S BANE." As you handle the ancient bone,
it crumbles 
into dusty fragments. 

212. Bilbo gets up from his chair with a start! "There was something that I

desperately needed to write -- I hope I'm not too late!" 

213. Haldir removes the blindfolds. "You have come to Cerin Amroth, in
ancient 
times the heart of our realm. Here ever blooms the winter flowers in the
unfading 
grass: the yellow elanor, the pale niphredil. Follow the stream to Galadriel.

214. The barrier shatters, fragments of stone flying in all directions to reveal
a 
small opening into a dark passageway beyond. One large stone remains. Carved
into it 
is a message: "Ask of the number of dwarven fathers."

215. The sounds of your digging echo through the halls. With a last, mighty 
blow, a crawlspace is cleared at the top of the debris pile, large enough even
for a 
big man to squirm through.

216. Tom Bombadil will go no further. He advises you to seek an old inn in Bree
named 
the Prancing Pony, whose innkeeper is named Barliman Butterbur. From there, he 
tells you, you are on your own. "Be bold, but wary! Keep up your merry
hearts, and 
ride to meet your fortune!"  You beg Tom to come with you, at least as far
as the 
inn, and drink once more with you, but he laughs and refuses, saying:
  "Tom's country ends here; he will not pass the borders. Tom has his
house to mind,
and Goldberry is waiting!" Then he turns, tosses up his hat, and departs,
his song 
fading into the distance behind you.

217. Once, Mirkwood was known as Greenwood the Great. Then Sauron the Enemy
built his 
great tower of Dol Guldur in the south end of the forest, and slowly corrupted
it, so 
it became known as Mirkwood, a dwelling place of evil things. His dungeons were 
corrupted by Sauron's magic, so that even when he wasn't there, the
prisoners would be 
tormented by his presence.  A more recent scrawl says: Only two creatures are
known 
to have entered Dol Guldur and escaped, through a secret entrance. The first is
the 
wizard known as Gandalf the Grey. The second is the creature Smeagol, now known 
as Gollum.

218. Hidden here in the dancing shadows, you find a great stone chest, worked 
with runes and carved with intricate, interwoven designs.

219. A chill settles on the party and the light flickers but does not fail. A
hollow 
voice, half-heard yet fully clear, whispers. "I sense one of the folk of
Bilbo here. 
Maybe even of his noble line."
  "True, Ori." a second voice chimes in. "Yet they will have to
prove themselves ere 
we tell them much." There are no creatures visible here, not even a ghost.
  "If they don't survive the crossing," the first voice replies,
"then they will be 
of no use to us at all, my good Oin."
  "Hmmph! I still say we need proof that they serve not the Shadow."
  "Orcfeathers!"
  "Oh, shave your beard!"
  The chill passes and you cast glances amongst one another. Surely the 
oppressive darkness has begun to drive you mad.
  Without warning the chill returns.
  "Seek to end our plight, whether day or night, in the seventh deep, where
the 
spirits sleep.' There, wagglebeard, does that appease you?"
  "Beware, I sense our master. We must return ere he finds us absent."
  Once again, the chill passes and you are alone beneath the stone of Moria.

220. After all that, all you find is a crumbling skull. The scroll has one word 
carved into it: "MORIA." As you handle the ancient bone, it crumbles
into dusty 
fragments.

221. You quickly climb down the handholds to the lower level.

222. "Thieves!" a booming voice commands. The chamber seems empty,
except for a 
pair of stone wings; but the voice is that of a dragon. "Touch my hoard and
I shall 
curse thee for eternity! Come closer and I shall make this chamber your funeral
pyre!"

223. The troll who stands here is a giant, even amongst its own kind. Powerful 
muscles ripple beneath its scaled skin. In one massive hand, it clutches a small

brown bird. "Gandalf. Gandalf!" the bird cries out. As the behemoth
troll stuffs 
the bird into its filthy satchel and reaches for its massive war club, the bird 
seems to say "Gandalf, it's I..." only to be cut off by the
muffling leather. 
Twirling its club like a baton, the monster advances, gurgling in what it might 
consider a chuckle.

224. How odd. This should be a dangerous climb, as the sides of this pit could 
collapse at any time, but you've never felt safer, more secure. You see
what caused 
the bright gleam -- it is a gem, as big and as beautiful as you have ever seen.
It is 
a blue sapphire, and in its center, an image of a golden eagle can be seen.
  "The Eagles of the North never had a chance to thank Bilbo for his part
in the 
death of our enemy, the dragon Smaug." a voice from the gem says. "We
offer this 
as a gift to his people, the hobbits, on whom the fate of Middle-earth rests. We
will 
come to your aid in a time of dire need -- but only when the need is uttermost.
Only 
one of Bilbo's people can summon us; this is our gift to them. We hope the
time 
never arises where you will need to use the Gem of Eagles, the Eye of
Manwe."

225. The book tells of the grim last moments of Balin's Folk. Oin was taken
by the 
Watcher in the Water. Loni and several others fell attempting the East Gate.
"We 
cannot get out!" the writer despairs. "The end comes... Drums, drums
in the deep. 
They are coming!" Then there is nothing more.

226. In the distance, you hear angry words -- it's a Black Rider, arguing
with the 
man who had been so rude to you before. The Black Rider lifts his sword, and the

death scream is terrible to hear. Fortunately, the Black Rider rides away, but
who 
knows where it might be lurking?

227. A hobbit-sized figure is sitting on the throne, looking at you with mock 
cheerfulness. It is Frodo! -- but not the Frodo that you know. He has become a
wraith, 
a shadow under the power of the Dark Lord of Mordor.   "Greetings my
friends. 
Don't look so alarmed, I understand everything now. The truth. Gandalf has 
deceived us all. He never cared for Bilbo. He never cared for me, or the Shire. 
  "No one cares for the Bagginses except the Ring, and Sauron made the
Ring. 
Only Sauron cares for the Shire -- he made the Ring to help us all. It should
never 
have been stolen from him in the first place; even the elves acknowledge that It
is 
his property, and it is our hobbitish obligation to return stolen goods, not try

to destroy them. Gandalf wanted to destroy it. It's Gandalf who's
evil, not the 
Dark Lord." Foolishly, you try to dissuade your former friend from the
cause of 
Sauron. "The enemies of Mordor must die!" the wraith-Frodo cries, and
he attacks 
you.

228. The mallorn tree is surprisingly easy to climb; it boughs are strong and 
sturdy. No wonder the dwellers of Caras Galadon built their homes in the 
trees, you think to yourself as you carefully survey the area.

229. It is a long hard match. Eventually, you force your opponent to the ground,
and 
hold his shoulders there. Belegcam grins: "You are indeed mighty! It has
been 
long since I had such a contest. May your strength endure for all your
days."

230. A handsome, tall, young elf sleeps upon the ground. As you approach, he
awakens 
and smiles. "Members of the Quest! I just had the oddest dream. In it, I
saw the East 
grow dark until the blackness was absolute, and the blackness spread until it 
overwhelmed Lorien. All seemed lost, but suddenly a light came from the west and

told me that you would come soon. It gave me a riddle to tell you. Converse with
me 
further, and I shall tell it."

231. The creature that approaches is a Balrog, a spirit of great and ancient 
evil. Eons ago, they were corrupted by the Dark Lord, Morgoth, into the service
of 
evil, and Morgoth made them his fiercest warriors, and gave them great power.
Only a 
wizard, using the full power of his staff, might defeat this monster; either a 
wizard, or a relic of a greater power.

232. The dwarves among you forget the recent misfortunes that have befallen the 
Fellowship and get very excited by the sight of the stone. "This pillar
marks the 
place where Durin first looked into the Mirrormere. Let us look ourselves, ere
we 
go!"

233. This is the council chamber of Elrond. Upon the dais there are many chairs;

this hall is used by Elrond to discuss matters of great importance.

234. Erestor strokes his chin in concentration. "Of course, there are the
tales of 
Trollslayer, a weapon of great power said to have been buried atop the Hill of
Teeth 
above Rivendell by the mighty elven Lord Gil-galad himself."

235. Gazing around, you spot a huge mallorn to the west. Surely that must be the
home 
of Galadriel and Celeborn. To the east, you spot the great river Anduin, and
beyond it a 
dark mass of trees. That must be the forest of Mirkwood. A black cloud lies
across it; 
that must be Dol Guldur, the northern citadel of the Dark Lord.

236. "This should be the turn of Aragorn, son of Arathorn." says
Elrond. "But alas, he 
could not be with us. The Sword that was Broken is Narsil, the sword of Elendil.

It was broken in battle against the Enemy long ago, and its pieces were lost
long 
ago. They must be found so the sword may be reforged." 
"Isildur's Bane is the One 
Ring, the Ring of Sauron. It was found by the halfling Bilbo, whom we honor here

today. The Ring is our greatest peril, and perhaps our only hope. Of these 
matters, Gandalf has much to say..."

237. The book continues on an unsullied page. "Lest it fall into evil
hands, we took 
Durin's mighty Axe and hid it where few would find it, protected by many
traps and 
guardians. So well did we disguise it, that only by means of Queen
Galadriel's 
Token would one find it again. This token we cast into the shaft of Durin's

chimney.

238. A note attached to the crate says:
  "I, Lotho Sackville-Baggins, Boss of the Shire, hereby agree to provide
in 
perpetuity, to the Sharkey Shipping Company, the best pipeweed that the Shire
can 
grow, in exchange for machinery and able Big Folk to assist me in the expansion 
of my improvements to the Shire.
  (Signed) Lotho-Sackville Baggins."

239. On the floor of this place is a skeleton, a man who died within this barrow

many years ago. He is covered in rags; even a cursory glance can tell that he
was 
not a prince or a soldier. A tomb robber, perhaps? If so, one can scarcely
imagine a 
worse choice of tombs to plunder. His only gain was a gem, still encased by his 
tightly clenched hand, but he did not live to take it out of here.

240. The scroll is dated a hundred years ago and says:
"The fortress of Dol Guldur is well-guarded. It would be folly to try to
assault it 
without the advantage of surprise, but sentries east of Dol Guldur make this 
impossible -- except for the forest labyrinth south of Dol Guldur. There are
many 
spiders and monsters in the maze (it was obviously built as a place to torment
his 
prisoners, but I have made a secret exit in the eastern face of the maze below
the 
Lawn of Statues). Through this exit, we can avoid the sentries." The scroll
is 
signed "G", obviously the symbol of Gandalf.

241. "The last guardian must be summoned by name ... "

242. The scroll is dated a hundred years ago and says: "The fortress of Dol
Guldur 
is thirteen levels tall, from its deepest pit, to its tallest tower. Within its 
fortress are many orcs, and dark magicks, but its most terrifying occupant is
the 
Necromancer, who is indeed the Witch-king of Angmar, given new shape again. I
urge 
the White Council to press for an assault; it is to be hoped that the revelation

will make Saruman less intractable." The scroll is signed "G",
obviously the 
symbol of Gandalf.

243. The waterfall holds special meaning for Legolas. He tells the story of 
Nimrodel and Amroth, two elves who loved each other deeply. "When dwarves
awoke 
the evil within the Mountains, many elves fled Lothlorien. And Amroth waited 
for her to come to the elf-havens in the South, but Nimrodel was lost in the 
White Mountains, and was never seen again. And yet this waterfall remembers her,

for if you listen very carefully to it, you can hear her voice, singing, in the 
sound of the cascade."

244. The Nazgul withers. You have a feeling he is not quite dead; he has merely 
abandoned this form, travelling shapeless and disgraced to Mordor. A thin 
but terrifying voice says: "The hour of Sauron approaches soon! Thy doom 
draws nigh!"

245. "All right!" the man breaks into sobs. "You know the truth
about poor, 
poor..." He struggles to compose himself, and doesn't do a very good
job. After a 
few minutes, he manages to continue: "He was looking into what happened to
Nob 
Appledore, and he went to that place, and nosed around. And they killed him! I
saw 
it! But you mustn't tell anyone. They'll kill us all!"

246. You race around the hill eight times. It is grueling, even to elves as
seemingly 
tireless as Legolas and Bragolhir. Legolas wins -- barely. "Truly Nessa
herself 
could not have given a greater effort." Bragolhir pants. "May the
Valar bless 
thee."

247. Earendil's star is the light of the Silmaril taken from the Iron Crown
of 
Morgoth, the Great Enemy, by the human hero Beren One-Hand. The Silmaril was
taken 
to the West by the sailor Earendil, who pleaded to the Valar for help against 
Morgoth. The Silmaril was placed in a ship by the Valar, and hallowed, and 
Earendil was made captain of the vessel. So late in the evening and early in the

morning the Star of Earendil can be seen, a symbol of the downfall of evil. So
great is 
the power of the star that its reflection is sometimes captured in magical pools

hallowed to Ulmo, the Vala of water who kept his friendship to elf and man even
in the 
time of exile. An empty vessel, filled with such water, will shine with the 
light of the star. 

248. Galadriel continues: 
"Take any of my commanders, even the Lord Celeborn. There is time to return
to 
Rivendell if you are quick, and gather aid from Elrond. Also, I give you an
option of 
great power and peril..."
  "On the west wall of this cleft, you will find an entrance. This leads to
an 
underground area I sealed long ago. It connected to Moria, but when Durin's
Bane 
stirred, other evils also wakened. I was forced to close that ancient entrance.
  "Within its caverns are great dangers, but also great treasures of wisdom
and 
power. Few would dare it, fewer still have the power to try. Only in such
desperate 
times as these would I offer the key to anyone. Take it if you wish this peril.
If you 
succeed, you may find a way to save the Quest of the Ring!"

249. "Greetings visitors. I am Linwen," a beautiful elven voice says
in greeting. She 
turns to you and says: "Soon I will depart, and either flee the Shadow and
the 
Enemy, or die. "What matter most troubles thy heart?"

250. There are many damaged pages then one reads briefly, "By Mahal, who
created the 
Naugrim, I..."

251. An elf is firing arrows into a target. He looks at you, and says: "I
am Urthel. 
Welcome, strangers, to Caras Galadon, the heart of elvendom in Middle-earth. May

the stars shine on your faces."
  Urthel is a cordial and friendly fellow, and you discuss many things. 
Conversation turns to his archery practice, as you admire the skill with which 
he placed arrows into the target. Urthel is pleased by the compliment. He
decides to 
offer you his assistance.
  "I know that you are on a dangerous quest. I am considered a good archer,
and 
an even better teacher. I can teach one of you the art of the bow, if you have
the 
time." Do you accept Urthel's offer?

252. "You see before you a large dark pool of water. In the center of the
pool are 
three extremely life-like granite statues, of what appear to be humans in heavy 
robes. Carefully aiming your light at where their faces should be, you see a
look of 
mixed surprise and horror. The water itself is still and very black."

253. A note says: "This is Galadriel's token. It is a symbol of the
friendship of 
the Eldar and the Naugrim. Two of these were made long ago by Queen Galadriel to

King Durin when he helped her escape from Sauron during ancient wars. Only one
other 
token is known to exist, in Moria. This token is used as one of the safeguards
to 
prevent Durin's axe from falling into the hands of our enemies. The other
is the 
Golden Wheel. Only with these items can Durin's Axe be regained."

254. To your horror, you recognize the dark shape that is crossing the chasm, a 
shape from the nightmares of all elves -- a Balrog of Morgoth. During the wars
of 
the First Age of Middle-earth, many elven heroes died at the hands of these
demonic 
creatures: Fingon, Ecthelion, even the great Feanor himself. Of all of the elf-
banes of Middle-earth, only Sauron himself is more deadly. You are doomed.

255. This is the Hall of the First Father, the heart of dwarven kind on earth.
To 
your wonder, the orcs have not marred these crypts, as is typical with their
kind. 
There are many stone sarcophagi here, more than you have ever seen before. 
They are covered in ancient inscriptions, written in the secret dwarven tongue.
  "This is no tomb." Gimli draws your attention to a stone marker.
"In time of 
great need, the tool of Durin will show the way..." he reads. "Alas, I
know not of 
this marker or its meaning. It was not spoken of in the legends that survived
the fall of Khazad-dum. It is clearly a barrier of sorts, but to where?"

256. Well now, here's a bit of the unexpected. The nose is a bit
weatherworn and the 
robe has seen better days, but this is most certainly meant to look like the
wizard 
Saruman himself. What an odd place to put a statue. Perhaps there is more here
than meets the eye?

257. Carefully smoothing out the crinkled, ale-stained pages of the ledger
scroll, 
you make out barely literate writing. The word "ORTHANC" has been
written in, along 
with yesterday's date. Both have been crossed out. Below them, the word
"ISENGARD" 
stands out on the page.

258. In a bold hand, the following is set forth: "Galadriel has extended
her 
influence to include the pass high above Lothlorien. Even the spirit of Caradhas
now 
bends his will to hers, allowing safe passage throughout the year. To call 
upon the Lady's power, simply speak her name to the spirit."

259. Many are the treasures within Khazad-dum. Within its labyrinthine layers
are gold, 
silver, and some of the mightiest weapons ever forged. While it is probable 
that the orcs have despoiled most of the wealth, it is unlikely that they have 
uncovered every hiding place of the cunning dwarves.
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