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Games - Company: Nintendo (13 result(s))

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Alleyway

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Intelligent Systems / Nintendo 1989
Genre: Action
Rating: 3.5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Game Boy

This is the summary of an analysis of Alleyway. The goal of the survey was to determine if this Game Boy launch title stands the test of time. The review process was the following: After an initial online research the game was tested thoroughly in its original environment and a simulation. Additionally a series of interviews and discussions was conducted with contemporary players. The collected data was examined which lead to a conclusion on the game’s merits and shortcomings.


Donkey Kong

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Nintendo 1983
Genre: Puzzle, Action
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: NES

Donkey Kong is the signature game of NES. While originally developed as an arcade game by Nintendo and later ported to every single console available at that time, NES has been the flagship product of Nintendo, and so it's only natural that it was here that the game was most visible. This game not only started the most successful game franchise of all times, it also transformed a 90-years old game cards company into an electronic entertainment behemoth and in the process set one of the most important legal precedents for the gaming industry.


Donkey Kong Jr.

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Nintendo 1988
Genre: Action
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Commercial
System: NES

The evil Mario, well known for his hate to the animal kingdom, has struck again. The latest plot of this dangerous plumber has been trapping Donkey Kong, and only his son, Donkey Kong Jr, can save him from ending as a circus sideshow.


Game & Watch Gallery 2

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Nintendo / Tose Software 1998
Genre: Action
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Game Boy

Chances are high that if you are a kid of the 80s, one of your first contacts to the world of video gaming was in the form of a Game & Watch game. If this name shouldn’t trigger flashbacks to black and grey gaming action with noisy beeping sounds: This was one of the most famous series of handheld electronic games. All of them consisted of just one game, which ran on a somewhat tiny LCD screen (think old pocket calculator), were the sprites appeared in predefined places. While the detailed cut-out characters were far superior to the very blocky graphics of contemporary video games, the lack of freedom of movement made for some very basic game concepts – most of the time you just had to jump between more or less safe spaces. As primitive as this might sound, back in the days they were actually pretty entertaining and handy too. Just imagine carrying around your games in palm sized plastic cases instead of being stuck with one of those old desktops! Besides at a price of 10-20$ they were actually affordable for kids and teens.


Ice Climber

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Nintendo 1984
Genre: Action
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: NES

Now you are an Eskimo, trapped in the world of running around slippy ice mountains, breaking your way forward with your big hammer in a quest to the upper levels, where you will recover the most precious item in the world: eggplants.


Kirby's Dreamland

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Hal Laboratory / Nintendo 1992
Genre: Action
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Game Boy

Kirby is a small bubble that can breath in air or small creatures and then blow it out at speeds that kill whatever is in its way. It can jump and fly, and it's got a mortal enemy it needs to dispose of. Welcome to Kirby's Dreamland, one of the easier platformers, which has become hugely popular with the not-so-adept-with-the-controls crowd. The game is fairly straight-forward: you proceed through four lands, each of which has its own architecture and monsters, and each of which has three stages. You fight a boss at the end of each stage, only to fight the main level boss at the end of each level. After finishing all stages, you fight the main bosses again, after which you meet the final boss. While clearing your way through the usual monsters requires nothing more than blowing air at them, most bosses throw things at you you've got to inhale and spit back at them. Yet, because you can fly and because you can always shoot, the game is much easier than, let's say, Mario platformers.


Super Mario Land

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Nintendo 1989
Genre: Action
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Game Boy

Besides Tetris, Super Mario Land likely belonged to the basic repertoire of most Game Boy players. The main character is the trade mark of the Nintendo corporation, distinctively the "plumber" Mario, who is on a quest for the kidnapped princess Daisy in order to free her. Obviously, the designers rather concentrated on tradition than on innovation when they constructed this background story.


Super Mario Land 2: 6 Golden Coins

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Nintendo 1992
Genre: Action
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Game Boy

As I am sitting down to write this review I start of with a seemingly good idea – which turns out to be horrible. I take the sentence ‘Super Mario Land 2 is a game’ and rewrite it over and over, adding a little detail each time. While the eighth or ninth iteration shapes up rather nice, it becomes really repetitive. What bothers me even more though, is that I say absolutely nothing about how I feel about the game at all. For some games this might be a good way to review them, but it seems really inadequate for this one. Maybe because when you have played a game for such a long time, talked with so many people about it, the game becomes more than the cartridge itself. The technical details might still be interesting, and maybe there is a thrilling essay about how fluid the animations are, or about the really creative level design in it, but I realise that I am not the person to write those, because I am far too biased. It is one of my all time favourite video games after all. So my mind starts wandering and I am thinking back at all those precious moments I shared with it…


Super Metroid

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Nintendo 1994
Genre: Action
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: SNES

At first: this game is no remake of the NES classic "Metroid". It is true that it takes place at the same locations especially at the beginning, but it is several years later than part 1 and 2.


Super Tennis

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Tokyo Shoseki / Nintendo 1991
Genre: Sport
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: SNES

One thing before: I am, presumably like 99, 997% of humanity, not a tennis fan. Actually I detest tennis. Now the reader asks: "Why the hell does this guy write a review of a tennis game?" I am an employee at a public service und therefore working in several offices from time to time. There you have - you can easily imagine - a lot of time to fritter away. What are you doing then? That's right! Gaming! But what? Everyone who has ever spent eight hours playing Minesweeper or Solitaire knows that there are more refreshing games. Other games like Counterstrike that enforce themselves in huge network (2000 computers) are unsuitable either, if you don't want to surprise your boss with sudden "Yeah!!! Head shot!!!" interjections...



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