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Games - Company: SSI (38 result(s))

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Allied General

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SSI 1995
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

Allied General – SSI's cash-in sequel to the Panzer General success. The original's roles are simply reversed: instead of the Axis powers, you play the Allied side. Oh, and it's on Windows, i.e. more difficult to get to run these days. Great, thanks!


Battles of Napoleon

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SSI 1990
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

You know, some time ago (about 200 years or so...), there was a great man (I avoid saying 'big' at his 1.60m height) who liked war. Maybe a bit of a pertinent introduction, but no matter if you are French of Anglo-Saxon, you are going to enjoy this.


Bugged

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Anssi Räisänen 2001
Genre: Adventure
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Freeware
System: Interpreter

It's every player's nightmare: An aspiring IF author (to make matters worse, one who is related to you) asks you to beta test his game. This can be fun, but if the game is really, really bad and if you can't really tell that to the person in question, things get ugly. Bugged is about you playing your cousin's first attempt at writing a game, and not only is it a completely linear set of boring rooms, located in a castle of a bog-standard fantasy kingdom, but pretty much everything imaginable went wrong technically - the game is bugged to the extreme. Most of the puzzle solutions don't work as expected and imagined by the author. So you have to find ways around those bugs. I.e. you exploit other bugs in order to progress.


Caesar

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Impressions 1992
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Amiga

"Intellectual property" is a fairly new invention of our lawyer-driven world. You can be sure that in the days of the ancient Roman Empire, nobody would have sued anyone for copying ideas. Maybe they would have sent a thug to rough you up, hired curthroats to murder your family or, if they were real meanies, sent an army to massacre your whole people, but they wouldn't have sued.


Caesar II

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Impressions / Sierra 1995
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

The sequel to Impressions‘ 1993 game Caesar, this Sierra title is the first in the City Builder Series to utilise the isometric view. Sporting a massive improvement visually and in terms of gameplay over the first game, it was also one of the relatively few games that could run natively in both MS-DOS and Windows 95.


Cohort II: Fighting for Rome

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Impressions 1993
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 1/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Amiga

Cohort II, even sharing the original's subtitle, has to be the laziest sequel in the history of the computer games industry. Why? It is virtually identical with its predecessor.

Let's have a look at what changed. Apart from the new title screen (Wow!), that is. Two languages the game previously spoke are not supported anymore (feature regression…). There are some new battlefield types, one of which ("marsh") is effectively the same as "bridge" combined with "hills" and the rest ("downs", "undergrowth" and "forest") plays just like the previously available "hills" as well. Of course, none of these new battlefields look any good graphically.


Cohort: Fighting for Rome

cohort01.png
Impressions 1991
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 1/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Amiga

In 1990, Impressions released Rorke's Drift, a wargame with an interesting setting (the Anglo-Zulu War) with a fresh challenge (defending a lightly fortified position against an overwhelming force). Problem was, in spite of its attempts to be accessible with its cartoonish graphics and icon-driven interface, it was basically unplayable. Cohort is basically just Rorke's Drift all over again, with a slightly different setting.


Colonial Conquest

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SSI 1987
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Atari ST

War without bloodshed? Easy, just don't show the individual's fate, but take it to a more abstract level. A way more abstract level: Push around wodden blocks on a world map, and suddenly, even genocide becomes fun! Like in Colonial Conquest.


Crime City

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Impressions 1992
Genre: Adventure
Rating: 1/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

So, apparently, I'm playing a guy called Steve. Steve's dad is the prime suspect in the murder of David Walker, his business partner. Since the police is incompetent (surprise, surprise), Steve has to prove his old man's innocence. Let's begin!


Cyber Empires

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SSI 1992
Genre: Strategy, Action
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

In the strategy genre, there is usually a distinction between high level strategy and low level tactics. Some games do one of them right, some excel at the other. Consolidating both levels into one game rarely works: It is the interface between the one which is hard to get right. One major aspect is that none of the levels may take up too much time, because otherwise, the players will forget about what happened on the other. How does this fare with Cyber Empires?



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