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Games - S (156 result(s))

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S.T.U.N. Runner

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Tengen / Domark 1990
Genre: Sport, Action
Rating: 2/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Atari ST

You've all gone through this: You see this amazing game, a technological marvel, a sensational experience. You buy the game, and then it turns out your own computer doesn't really seem to be up to it. These days, you'd just go out and buy a new video card or a faster processor, but in 1990, that just wasn't possible - because all hardware on the consumer market wouldn't have cut it in some cases. Cue S.T.U.N. Runner.


Sabor

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Gamos Ltd. 1991
Genre: Action
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

Here is a wonderful game – a simulation of hand-to-hand fighting created in a country that had been called the USSR. In the early 90s, the creation of computer games in the former Soviet Union still began to develop, and game "Sabor" is one of the brightest representatives of the dawn Russian entertainment industry.


Saboteur

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Durell Software 1986
Genre: Action
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: ZX Spectrum

Of all Spectrum games, Saboteur was one of the most unique and entertaining ones. Unlike most Spectrum games, it was neither pure action, nor a text adventure, and not even an arcade. The game was a blend of action and puzzle; quick thinking was more important than quick fingers, and keeping your cool was they key to success. Good memory or at least decent mapping skills were not useless, either.


Sam & Max Hit the Road

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Lucas Arts 1994
Genre: Adventure
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

Which character appeared most in Lucas Arts' Adventure games? Chuck the Plant, I guess. Just counting the mammal characters, though, it's Sam & Max. Their creator, Steve Purcell had been drawing backgrounds for many of the games, and Sam, the dog, and Max, the rabbit, had small guest appearances (e.g. as an idol in front of the giant monkey head, as a costume on Booty Island and as a portrait in the Edison's motel). And then, it was time for their own game.


Santa's Xmas Caper

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Zeppelin Games 1992
Genre: Action
Rating: 2/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Amiga

Santa Clause was already on his way to deliver presents when his flying sleigh was blown out of balance by a gust of wind – now the presents are dispersed all over the city. Time to go down and pick them all up again, because otherwise, so many children would cry themselves to sleep that night. Sniff…


Scenario: Theatre of War

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Starbyte 1992
Genre: Action, Strategy
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Commercial
System: C64

Formally set in the time of the First World War, Scenario pits four powers against each other in the struggle for supremacy over the European continent. Each player starts off with one selected territory and a small army and from there, it's aggressive expansion – into neutral territories first, and then head-to-head against the active opponents.


Schwert und Magie 1: Das geheimnisvolle Kraut

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German Design Group 1989
Genre: RPG
Rating: 2/6
Licence: Commercial
System: C64
You believed episodic computer game series are a modern-day invention? Even before this concept was put into a first spotlight by Simulmondo in the early 1990s, the German Design Group had a go at it. Probably inspired by the commercial success of the Fighting Fantasy line of books, their Schwert und Magie games show a striking resemblance on many counts at least.

Schwert und Magie 2: Der unheimliche Tempel

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German Design Group 1989
Genre: RPG
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Commercial
System: C64
Der unheimliche Tempel is located right in the heart of the same floppy disk which already housed the predecessor. Not a lot could possibly have changed then, right? Conceptually maybe not, but that wouldn't have been in the concept of the series anyway. So it is just additional fodder for veteran adventurers of the first part? Indeed, but nevertheless, second parts of such series are usually of particular interest. Why? Because the first game can be seen as a kind of concept study demonstrating the game mechanics for a player trial. Making the second one the real "first" game.

Schwert und Magie 3: Das Piratenhaus

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German Design Group 1990
Genre: RPG
Rating: 2/6
Licence: Commercial
System: C64
What started as a simple delivery job turns into a new adventure: in the trading town of Lübeck – err, Trahve – our protagonist just happens to come by a damsel in distress and learns about the treasure of a former pirate captain in the process, which just happens to be hidden in her basement. Just that this basement is chock full of deadly traps; and other shady characters are also after the gold.

Schwert und Magie 4: Die Burg des Magiers

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German Design Group 1990
Genre: RPG
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Commercial
System: C64
Just by flipping the floppy disk, we've been magically transported from the pirate coast back to generic sword & sorcery waters. Back to right where the very first part of the series left off: that story's bad guy has kidnapped the familiar princess and keeps her prisoner on his castle. The king can't just send his army, as that would cause a major diplomatic crisis with the already not too friendly neighbour. So our adventurer has to take things into his own hands again.


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