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Games - Rated by: LostInSpace (17 result(s))

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Seas of Blood

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Puffin Books 1985
Genre: RPG
Rating: 3.5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Gamebook, ZX Spectrum
[Mr Creosote] Seas of Blood… this is going to be a tough discussion for me, because I have to admit this was the gamebook which I read/played more often than any other when I was a kid. Whether this was due to thematic preference, due to gameplay-related strengths or other aspects, we will probably find out. However, I cannot guarantee that I can stay objective at all times. Please excuse the occasional drift into nostalgia.

Shard of Inovar

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Bulldog Software 1987
Genre: Adventure
Rating: 2/6
Licence: Commercial
System: C64
Simple games often also use simple graphics lead by practical means. The game is then carried by the solid gameplay foundation or – in the adventure genre – by a good plot. Shard of Inovar's plot, in any case, isn't a tired one at all. Just like the controls. Small pictograms on the sides of the screen trigger certain actions. Judged by the number of icons, the game is actually rather short and some symbols, like for example "swim", are never required to solve the game. Invoke, on the other hand, conjuring up a magic spell or following through a ritual, is used quite frequently. Yes, you guessed right: this takes place in the fantasy genre. Authors Les Hogarth and Clive Wilson were leading figures at Mastertronic at the time and they published this text adventure as part of a trilogy together with VENOM and KOBYASHI NARU also on other platforms than the C64. My quality expectations are somewhat high as I first dive in.

Temple of Terror

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Puffin Books 1985
Genre: RPG
Rating: 3.5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Gamebook, ZX Spectrum
[LostInSpace] Pencils sharpened and dice ready (or should I say: dice throwing app launched?). Our journey leads us to the Temple of Terror. Let's hope it's not all in the name. A lonesome adventurer just happens to be a the Stonebridge court at the wrong time and learns that all of Allansia is threatened by the dark proceedings of the evil Malbordus. Travelling to the Temple of Terror, he is supposed to take the dragon artefacts hidden there to safety, because they would enable the dark elf to conjure a dragon which would take him to an army in the Forest of Doom, ready to bring death and despair over the land.

The Forest of Doom

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Puffin Books 1983
Genre: RPG
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Gamebook, C64

On planet Allansia, our hero travels across the Northern Borderlands without meeting a single soul. Until one night, he is wakened from his sleep only to witness the final words of a dying dwarf called Bigleg. His mission to take a legendary weapon of war to Gillibran, the king of dwarves, at the edge of Darkwood, failed. It has been stolen in an ambush. Without this weapon, the dwarf kingdom of Stonebridge is in danger from warmongering trolls. Bigleg promises our nameless hero great riches if he can find the war hammer again and bring it to its rightful owner. Then he dies right under our eyes.


Wizardry 7: Crusaders of the Dark Savant

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Sir Tech 1992
Genre: RPG
Rating: -
Licence: Commercial
System: PC
This is the German version of the notoriously hard RPG.

Wizardry Gold

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Sir-Tech 1996
Genre: RPG
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

In the history of CRPGs, the Wizardry series should give every old school gamer a chill of ecstasy. The series began already in the early 80s and ended only in 2001 with Wizardry 8: Destination Dominus, but under licence, it has multiple further spin-offs. like Wizardry Online, primarily in Japan until the year 2012. An icon of game design called D. W. Bradley created the huge worlds of Wizardry V: Heart of the Maelstorm (1988), Wizardry VI: Bane of the Cosmic Forge (1990) and finally Wizardry VII: Crusaders of the Dark Savant (1992) for the company Sir-Tech before jumping ship and founding his own software company. D. W. Bradley even surpassed himself and created the (in my view) only legitimate successor to Wizardry 7, namely Wizards and Warriors, already one year before Wizardry 8.


Wolfenstein 3D

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id Software 1992
Genre: Action
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Shareware
System: PC

This is an action game which is commonly seen as the great-grandfather of all ego shooters. It was the year 1992 when this virus, disguised as Shareware, was travelling across busy schoolyards and noisy scene parties, spreading from drive to drive. The shooting orgy by American star programmer John Carmack had an irresistable appeal to the teenagers who hadn't yet been cauterised by mass-produced imitations of this ego perspective, and the extra episodes which were available for sale made John Carmack a millionaire overnight.



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