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Mad Doctor

maddoctor01.png
Creative Sparks 1985
Genre: Adventure, Action
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: C64

I must admit I'm a sucker for classic horror movies and novels. I'm also one of these people who cheer for the bad guys and abhore the wimpy do-gooders. For all those with similarly sick minds, the 80s produced the computer game of our dreams: Mad Doctor.


Mad News

madnews01.png
Ikarion 1995
Genre: Action
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Amiga

Mad TV's success virtually begged for a sequel. Rainbow Arts announced Mad Burger, a fast-food chain simulator. Ralph Stock, designer of the first part, had left the company, though, and he was working in Mad News which was published by Ikarion. Mad Burger never made it, but two years later, Mad TV 2 (the only 'official' sequel) appeared - and it sucked. This review is about Mad News, however. The game which should probably be called the only rightful successor of the original game.


Mad TV

madtv01.png
Rainbow Arts 1991
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

This is one of the few german games which got much international attention. And it really deserved it. Basically, it's a pretty tipically german genre: a business sim. But in contrast to lame tries like Winzer this one is really fun! The reasons for this are simple.


Mad TV 2

MT00.png
Greenwood Entertainment 1996
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Freeware
System: PC

Who didn't think about opening one's own TV station and broadcasting one's favourite movies without commercial breaks? Well, then you've come to the right place with Mad TV / Mad TV 2. The successful game's sequel is good for some discussion and different from the predecessor, it is not about conquering Betty Botterbloom, but really just about building up a successful TV station. (We already successfully got rid of her again in Mad News after all and now we're happy to be single again ;) )


Mafia

mafia01.png
Igelsoft 1986
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: C64

You may smile ironically about the graphics of C64 games. You may even consider them ugly. I won't protest much. In fact, I have to confess I don't value the 'multimedia' capabilities of this computer too highly myself. I can understand everyone who appreciates these extremely blocky looks, but I've been 'socialized' by other machines mainly. One thing is undeniable, though: The C64 had and still has the most creative 'user scene'! Even today, new programs are being written by the followers of this small computer, some even released commercially.


Mag!!!

mag01.png
Greenwood 1995
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Amiga

A safe way for a game to become successful back in the 'golden days' was to get good reviews in the magazines dealing with computer games. Most companies went with simple bribery (even though you never believed this of course, eh?).


Magic Carpet

mcarpet01.png
Bullfrog / Electronic Arts 1994
Genre: Action
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

There are only so many excuses for 3D shooters. Magic Carpet at least has a tiny bit of originality: You're a sorcerer flying around on a magic carpet (oh, really?) trying to take over the world. This works by collecting mana and storing it in your fortress. Once you've collected enough, you can proceed to the next level.


Magic of Endoria

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German Design Group / Sunflowers 1994
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

When Magic of Endoria was released in June 1994, it belonged to a relatively new kind of games which let their players build and administrate a dungeon. This makes Magic of Endoria a kind of forerunner of the well-known Dungeon Keeper. Although Magic of Endoria was released as a C64 and a PC version, both games are quite different. This anomaly was caused by the success of games like Dune 2 (late 1992) and Warcraft (early 1994) which founded the real time strategy genre and started a hype. While the C64 version stayed a turn-based game as initially planned, the PC variant received an obstructive real-time corset in order to ride the wave.


Magic Pockets

magicpockets01.png
Bitmap Brothers 1991
Genre: Action
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

Light off, spot on for the coolest boy in town: Bitmap Kid! (Yes, that's his real name.)

Don't ask for any background story here, that's completely irrelevant. You get a Jump 'n Run here with some uncommon ideas. The first and main thing about this is the versatility of your main weapon. Now... don't ask me what that is supposed to be. As it looks the Bitmap Kid is able to throw little whirlwinds out of his pocket. According to the time you keep the fire button pressed this whirlwind can also be quite big. The biggest variant will often turn monsters into some sort of pointdelivering goodie. That variant also has another ability: If you step on it it will hurl you up into the air - in that mode you can get higher than with normal jumping and also you can bounce through monsters. Downside is a certain lack of control over your movement. For some tasks you need it though.


Magnetron

magnetron01.png
Graftgold / Firebird 1988
Genre: Action
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Commercial
System: ZX Spectrum

Meta robot KLP-2 from Quazatron is back: This time, the reactors of eight satellites have to be shut down. Of course, these satellites are full of robots to destroy as well.

KLP-2 moves (or rather floats) over the three-dimensional platforms which now have a fixed distinction into screens (circumventing the problem of the rather slow scrolling). Again, it's all looking and moving very smoothly - technically, this is yet another step forward from the already high standard the predecessor set.



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